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Step by Step - Replacing the starter motor 1998 S70

Help, Advice and DIY Tutorials on Volvo's extremely popular car line -- Volvo's 1990s "bread and butter" cars -- powered by the ubiquitous and durable Volvo inline 5-cylinder engine.
1992 - 1997 850, 850 R, 850 T5-R, 850 T5, 850 GLT
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Step by Step - Replacing the starter motor 1998 S70

Postby tina » 01 Nov 2009, 05:18

I just accomplished this job, here's how I did it. Please forgive my lack of knowledge of the correct names for many parts, I am a complete amateur and I stumbled my way through with the help of forum members!

For the purposes of this description, left and right will be relative to the person standing in front of the car facing the engine. Also "in front" will then refer to closer to the person.

Symptoms: Key is turned, click is heard but no attempt to turn over. Headlights bright. Jump starting does not coax even an attempt at turn over. ie. not alternator or dead battery, not fuel delivery as it would try to crank then. This car is a manual transmission so no PNP to worry about.

Tools: socket driver and extension, 14mm and 12mm sockets, torx drivers and a few other assorted sizes I did not measure. 2 nylon zip ties to replace the ones you cut. A large flat head screwdriver for prying stubborn connectors.

1. Loosen the clamp on the negative battery and remove it from the post. I used electric tape to fasten it out of the way. Loosen the clamp on the positive terminal and remove that cable too.

2. Pull up on the battery hold-down clamp on the left near side of the battery shelf, until it pops out. Pick up the battery be careful if it has leaked not to touch the fluid.

3. Remove the bolts that hold the battery shelf down. pull the shelf left and up to remove it from the side of the engine compartment. Pull up slowly as there are parts underneath. Disconnect the electrical connector and the vacuum elbow leading to these attached parts, and remove the battery shelf from the car.

4. remove the fresh air intake hose by disconnecting it first from the air box side, then slide it back and down to remove the hose from the fasteners at the front of the engine.

Although it is possible in theory to remove the starter without removing anything further, I found it impossible to get any purchase on the bolts with the very limited room. Instead I removed the fan shroud as recommended elsewhere on this site.

5. First, remove the torx screws show here. There are also 2 hex screws to remove about 3" directly below the torx screws. Pull up sharply on the top shelf of the fan shroud to separate it from the fan shroud body and access the electrical connectors below. Disconnect those. Cut the zip ties that secure the cables to the fan shroud so the cables can remain behind when you pull the fan out. Disconnect all the cables that are shown in the picture. Basically you want to get them all off of the fan so you can leave them in place and take out the fan. The one labelled #5 is held on to the shroud by a metal bracket, once the hex screw (#2) is removed the bracket can be snapped off from the fan. Disconnect the rubber connector below the area held by the bracket.

Tina 1.jpg


Tina 2.jpg


tina 2.5.jpg


Tina 6.jpg


6. Once the fan is disentangled from the cables you can lift it directly up, leaving the top part off to the side still attached to some connections. The hose at the left going into the box with the timing belt diagram on it can be detached close to that box. Remove the fan from the engine and set it aside.

Picture of the fan shroud and air intake hose out of the car.

Tina 3.JPG


7. Remove the plastic snap-on cover from the starter solenoid.

8. Remove the nut from the left of the solenoid and take off the 2 wires connected there. Put the nut back on the empty bolt to avoid losing it (in case new part does not come with it). Pull the additional wire off the solenoid located directly below the nut you just removed. Remove the wire/connector from directly below the nut that secures the bracket at the left of the solenoid.

Picture of the engine compartment with fan shroud removed and the top portion moved to the side, and the connections that need to be removed from the solenoid.

Tina 7.jpg


9. use a 12mm socket with extension and drive to remove the bolt from the starter motor bracket on the left side of the solenoid.

10. use a 14mm socket to remove the 2 additional bolts that secure the right side of the starter. These are accessed from the right side of the starter and there is very little space, but mine were not on too tight. The one on the far side did not have space for an extension on the socket due to other hoses in the way. These 2 bolts are located on the top far side and the bottom near side of the motor... look at the new motor to figure it out. The near top side has a dowel that sticks into a hole, no bolt.

11. With all the bolts off, you may need to wiggle the motor quite a bit to detach it from its position. I found that grabbing the large bracket and wiggling it up and down firmly was necessary to dislodge it. It can be pulled left and up once dislodged.

12. Place the new motor in the same orientation, first lining up the dowel with the correct hole, then hand thread all 3 bolts in place as far as you can. Tighten the bolts with the socket driver. Reconnect the wire to the plug below the bracket bolt, and the one that connects to the solenoid. Remove the nut on the solenoid, put the 2 wires that end in washer-like connections onto the connector bolt on the solenoid and refasten the nut. Your starter is replaced!

New starter going in

Tina 5.JPG


13. Now to put everything else back... place the fan back in place, setting it into the holes at the bottom of the radiator and lining up the air hose to the box with the timing belt diagram on it. Make sure no cables are trapped behind it, then re-align the top connector part that you left in the engine, replacing those connections. Thread new nylon zip ties through the holders where you cut the old ones off and refasten the cables in place. Push the top connector shelf onto the fan lining up the square slide-brackets on both sides. Reconnect the vacuum tube to the top of the fan area.

14. Re-fasten the torx screws at the top of the fan shroud. Plug back in all the connectors that you unplugged. PLace the cylindrical connector at the right back into its bracket, reconnect the hose beneath, and place the metal bracket back onto the fan, re-fasten the hex screw through the bracket. Refasten the left hex screw too. Double check with a flashlight to ensure there are no orphaned vacuum hoses or wires.

15. Replace the air intake hose, put the far side in below the air box to give you space to move, then pull the hose up into the connectors at the front of the engine, then line up the back of the hose with the air box and snap into place.

16. put the battery shelf back in place, reconnecting the vacuum hose and the electrical connection to the bottom. Push the 2 prongs into the holes in the right side of the engine compartment, replace the bolts that secure the shelf down.

17. Clean the battery cables and the battery posts with a wire brush, apply petroleum jelly. Place the battery onto the shelf, ensuring that the bottom lip is pushed under the securing lip of the shelf, and slide all the way to the right. Replace the hold-down bracket at the left near side of the battery. Replace the positive cable and tighten the clamp. Replace the negative cable and tighten the clamp.

18. Close the hood and ensure no pets or people are nearby, in case you forget something in the fan that could go flying. Start your car!

Full size pictures available here:

http://picasaweb.google.com/tina.noyes/ ... directlink
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Re: Step by Step - Replacing the starter motor 1998 S70

Postby holler1 » 01 Nov 2009, 23:23

Very thorough job and an excellent writeup!

I had forgotten about the side bolts on the starter, but now I remember those were very hard to get to without removing the fan.

FYI, #5 is an electrical valve that is part of the Evap system that routes vapors from the fuel tank first into a carbon canister and then into the engine.
1998 Volvo V70 AWD 165000-R muffler, HD endlinks, boost gauge
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Re: Step by Step - Replacing the starter motor 1998 S70

Postby tina » 02 Nov 2009, 02:08

holler1 wrote:Very thorough job and an excellent writeup!

I had forgotten about the side bolts on the starter, but now I remember those were very hard to get to without removing the fan.


The rear bracket bolt was on so tight that I could not get any leverage without removing the fan. If it was not on so tight I may have had a chance of getting it, but no way could I have got to the side ones. I didn't even know which side the heads were on, I was looking on the left they came in from the right!

holler1 wrote:FYI, #5 is an electrical valve that is part of the Evap system that routes vapors from the fuel tank first into a carbon canister and then into the engine.


Ah, good thing I hooked that part back up then :) I didn't know what many of those connecters were, I had names for them in my head but I should not repeat them in public :lol:
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Re: Step by Step - Replacing the starter motor 1998 S70

Postby niles » 20 Mar 2010, 22:03

Very thorough step by step explanation, Tina! I wouldn't have been able to do it without your help.Several Notes: A new starter (Bosch) from the dealer doesnt have the studs for mounting the bracket. Instead, there are 2 flush mounted screws which look smaller in diameter than the studs. The mechanics just leave the bracket off when replacing the starter. One can buy the solenoid seperately, which is what failed on mine. $271 for the solenoid so you can use your original motor, or $309 for a whole new starter.
When pulling the fan shroud shelf, take note of how the vacuum lines are attached to the solenoid underneath. Yellow plastic line to the vertical fitting and lavender line to the horizontal fitting. Yellow line terminates on the vacuum fitting on the throttle cable spool bracket, the lavender on the SAS valve a top the turbo.
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Re: Step by Step - Replacing the starter motor 1998 S70

Postby cread » 01 Apr 2011, 17:01

on mine i had 2 red cables on the first nut (closest to radiator ) and a green wire that connected to spade connecter and on nut closest to motor just the small braided ground wire ? is that right ?
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Re: Step by Step - Replacing the starter motor 1998 S70

Postby Whitebird » 06 Jul 2011, 05:11

cread wrote:on mine i had 2 red cables on the first nut (closest to radiator ) and a green wire that connected to spade connecter and on nut closest to motor just the small braided ground wire ? is that right ?

That's what I found on my car, cread.

This is a footnote to this tutorial for anyone with a 1999 Volvo S70 (Base). I found the starter replacement process just as Tina describes (down to the socket sizes), except that I did not need to remove the fan and housing (steps 5, 6, 13, & 14). I'm not sure if the 1999 is dimensionally different, or my bolts just weren't so tight.

Thanks, Tina, for a great tutorial!
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Re: Step by Step - Replacing the starter motor 1998 S70

Postby NicksVolvo » 08 Jul 2011, 04:17

Tina rocks! Nice job on the instructions and documentation.

So I have replaced the starter and it starts fine, however it does not disengage and is spinning with the engine after the car starts. I checked all of the fuses and they appear ok, battery is also checked out ok.

I purchased the car about a year ago and the ignition key sometimes turns 180 degrees before it engages so I suspect it may be this, but not sure so checking to see if anyone has had this symptom before I go replace this.

I do know on some American cars that you have to shim the starter back sometimes if this occurs, but I am thinking this is unlikely.

One other thing the starter motor is a refurbished unit from Pep Boys, not new.

I did not really pay attention to the polarity of the two wires going to the starter, but they looked like they went back on the same terminals they came off of. If these were reversed I am pretty sure the motor would spin backwards so this should not be it. The small green wire between the two main power lines is connected.

Any ideas are appreciated before I go down the ignition key replacement path.

Thanks!
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Re: Step by Step - Replacing the starter motor 1998 S70

Postby bronxnativ » 09 Jul 2011, 02:16

You would receive much more responses and views if you created a new post versus posting your issue on an old one.

Your problem sounds like the starter, not the ignition. Try to buy an OEM starter. I just purchased a rebuilt from Erie (Bosch, which is OEM) and it comes with a lifetime warranty. All for $75.00
Erie has received good reviews from the members, so I'm hoping I will not have any issues with my starter.

Good luck!
Al
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Re: Step by Step - Replacing the starter motor 1998 S70

Postby tcvt » 24 Jul 2011, 02:48

I just replaced the starter on my 1997 Volvo Turbo Wagon (215k miles). There are probably several ways to do this, but I'll add a few tips to Tina's useful post. It took 3hrs to get it apart and an hour to get it back together. I could shave two hours off the disassembly if I had to do it again.

Disconnect the battery.

Remove the throttle pulley cover so you can see things more clearly (one T20 screw).

I did not remove the battery or the battery tray. Both Tina and the Volvo VADIS instructions recommend removing the battery and battery tray.

I did not remove the panel of connectors mounted above the intercooler.

Disconnect the upper hose coming from the intercooler at the intercooler and at the throttle body and move it out of the way. It had a non-reusable hose clamp at its third connection and I did not have replacement hose clamps, so I left it connected and mushed it all to the passenger side. Disconnect the two connectors you'll find in there in order to move the hoses more.

I did not completely remove the cooling fan. I tried to get the starter out without moving or removing the fan. I even removed the oil dipstick to try to get more room, which in the end is probably not necessary (it's a 12mm bolt with its head facing the ground). I rotated the fan on its lower driver's side screw, over toward the driver's side, after unplugging its connector from the connector above the intercooler. The fan has *slots* for the bottom two torx screws (T20) and the fan will slide over the heads of these bottom torx screws after loosening them. The bottom screws do *not* have to be completely removed in order to remove the fan or to rotate it to the side as I did. I didn't notice the slots until reassembly. I rotated it to avoid having to remove the bottom screw on the driver's side after having a knuckle-scraping good time with the lower passenger side screw. Knowing (a little too late) that the bottom screws only need to be loosened, it might be easy to remove the fan. If for some reason you rotate it to the side instead of removing it, you will have to remove the circular rubber mount located under the air intake hose (I think it's #5 on Tina's picture). It holds a vacuum device that has an electrical connector. The mount is held in by two T20 screws. I have read that removing the fan is not necessary in order to remove the starter. I had no success. Maybe it is possible to do so if you remove the bracket from the back of the starter before you pull the starter out???

With an extension on a ratchet you can get to the 12mm bolt attaching the back bracket on the starter to the block. Remove it now. Remove the wires from the starter now, too, to avoid the possibility of wires that are connected to the starter being damaged when you knock the starter loose from the block and it suddenly drops.

There is a stiff wire harness down there, mounted to the frame crossmember. To get more mobility in those wires that are near the starter bolt heads in order to get a wrench on the bolts, you can disconnect the clamp holding that harness in the vicinity of the transmission dipstick. The clamp is fastened by a 10mm nut. Now you can access the two 14mm bolts that mount the starter to the block. I used a 14mm Gearwrench that has no offset as well as an offset box wrench. Loosen the 14mm bolts a few turns, then tap the starter loose from the block before removing the bolts the rest of the way. The lower radiator hose runs past the heads of the bolts. Consider leaving the bolts in their block holes instead of fighting the hose to get the bolts out and then back in.

Reassembly.

Start the two 14mm bolts on the starter first and then do the 12mm bracket bolt. This way was much easier than doing the 12mm first, after setting the starter on the locating pin. Reattach the wires. Test the starter now if you are a pessimist. Optimists - keep going... (I installed a junkyard starter that I had gone over by a fantastic local rebuilder of alternators and starters and have done whatever was necessary. It was trash and he untrashed it. Coming from him, I consider it better than new). If you have someone like this in your area (they are becoming rare as hen's teeth) get your own parts rebuilt by them and never buy chain or local auto parts store rebuilds. Not only will you spend locally, but you will get a better replacement part. Are there any more local auto parts stores anymore, ie not a NAPA, CarQuest? I digress...

Set the fan back on the lower screws (which should not have been removed). Replace the two upper fan screws.

The rest is straightforward... enter radio code... make sure there are no 'extra' bolts leftover...
Pessimists - cross your fingers and turn the key.
Optimists - put everything away, shower, go out and get a beer, or whatever you enjoy for a pat on the back.
All of us - envy those owners of older cars who can replace a starter in 20 minutes.

Tom
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Re: Step by Step - Replacing the starter motor 1998 S70

Postby bronxnativ » 24 Jul 2011, 15:13

Appreciate the pointers. My starter is slowing acting up. Looks like I'll have to tackle this job sometime soon.
Al
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Re: Step by Step - Replacing the starter motor 1998 S70

Postby getoverit52 » 26 Sep 2011, 00:23

Hi Tina:
I thank you dearly for your excellent tutorial:
I spent my weekend removing, repairing and reinstalling my starter following your instructions and pictures and just had to join so I could thank you for doing such a great job.
My volvo has 478,000 Km (nearly 300,000 miles) and the wire between the solenoid and starter was completely disintegrated. The car had "not started" several times in the last 2 years but this time it was when I found that problem, and fixed it with your help.
Thanks again
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Re: Step by Step - Replacing the starter motor 1998 S70

Postby cn90 » 26 Sep 2011, 16:18

Great DIY!

I just want to add a comment. If your starter motor is going out (usually around 140-150K miles or so), your PCV is long overdue.

If you do both (PCV Overhaul + Starter Motor) together, you save a lot of time/labor!

During the PCV Overhaul (see Stickies above by "jablackburn"), once the Intake Manifold is off, the Starter Motor is in plain sight:


Volvostartermotor.JPG
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Re: Step by Step - Replacing the starter motor 1998 S70

Postby matthew1 » 24 Oct 2011, 01:47

These are my notes on this procedure for...

1996 Volvo 850 non-turbo Starter Replacement, ta-da

It's pretty much exactly how everyone henceforth has described. I chose to take the fan out. I can't see how it's possible without removing it. You who didn't are true auto-magicians.

I took out as much as I could, at risk of not putting it back together right. Which was the hardest part of the whole thing. I did not remove the battery and tray.

Image
I removed the purge valve holder entirely. I had to use penetrating oil on every metal thing that twisted on this 200k+ mile car.

Image
Took out air intake piping. This is easy, a no-brainer. Note: Converse shoes not part of air intake piping.

Image
I have a poor memory.

Image
With all the junk out of the way, it was time for the fan. Only the top two 20mm Torx are necessary to remove!

Image
As Tcvt mentioned earlier, the bottom mounts on the fan have slots that just slide (up when you're removing the fan) down onto their screws (2 of them). I didn't even have to loosen these.

Image
It's loose now. Just wiggle up and out.

Image
The intake elbow and hose to airbox had to go (l). Then it was time for the starter. Do the three electrical connections (one a slide-off spade), and the three physical mounts, and it's out. In this photo are the three physical mount bolts.

Image
The beautiful reman starter from Erie, former MVS sponsor. Sigh.

Image
On the bench seat, all the stuff that comes out, in chronological order, left to right. That short vac hose next to the fan was a nuisance, so I pulled it out.

Like most, it was 3 hours. Next time, 1.5 I'd bet. Best part of today: no leftover pieces. :wink:
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Re: Step by Step - Replacing the starter motor 1998 S70

Postby kcjones » 24 Oct 2011, 03:06

Applause to you, good sir :-)

No really, I'm glad someone helped him do that. As troubling as it was for me, I can't imagine what he'd have gone through.
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