Volvo’s Electronic Throttle Module (ETM)

Understand and fix your Volvo electronic throttle module (ETM) problems.

Volvo’s ETM fiasco is here, it’s bad, and here’s what you can do about it.

Volvos Affected by ETM Failure

Before 1999, Volvo used a good old mechanical set of parts to control the throttle. In 1999, they switched to a “fly-by-wire” module. Volvo’s 1999-2002 ETM fails because there is physical contact between two small parts that results in wear, then damage, then failure. This design affects almost a half-million Volvo gasoline cars.

If you’ve got a 1999-2002 Volvo that goes into “limp home” mode or has erratic throttle behavior, your Volvo may be suffering Electronic Throttle Module (ETM) failure, and you’re probably angry.

Where Things Stand Now

Owners are still “on their own” with this failure, but less “on their own” than they were before 2006. Now Volvo will pay to have the ETM replaced under a 2006 recall, but this can follow great cost to the owner because dealers require many parts be in 100% working order before a new ETM replacement work order is declared.

ETM Resources Here on MVS

First, we’ve got an entire sub-forum dedicated to the Volvo ETM problem. It’s called Don’s ETM Room, named after Colorado (US) native Don Willson, a man who has spent over three years (and counting) working to make Volvo take responsibility for this part.

Recently a company named XeMODeX introduced a $600 service that refurbs your ETM with new, non-contacting parts.

Volvo ETM Forum Posts

In addition, we’ve got various posts in the Volvo Forum.

There are many many more ETM posts here, just use the Search This Site box at the very top of all MVS pages, and please get back to us with your ETM story, experience or solution. Please register and share your thoughts in Don’s ETM Room.

If you’re lost, see the Help page for information on how to find information and how to register and post to the Volvo Forum.