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Volvo V70 Rear Shock Replacement Tutorial

This happens to be for 1998 Volvo V70 Rear Shock Absorber + Mount.

An excellent write-up for replacing rear shocks on 1993-2000 Volvo 850/V70/S70/C70.

NOTE:

1. The trickiest part of this job is in the bolt holding the Shock Mount. These bolts were rusted through and I broke one of them (it took 3 hours to get the stud out!). Learned my lesson, and the rest is easy.
The Nut is welded to the chassis.

– Once the car is safely on jack stand. From underneath apply some grease on the Bolt part below the nut. This way when the bolt is removed, the grease is sucked into the nut.
– Spray the top of these bolts with WD-40 or PB Blaster. Let it sit for 30 minutes.
Go and do something else in the mean time.
Then loosen these bolts about 2 full turns. Once you feel the resistance, this is when the rust is drawn into the nut. Stop here. Again, Spray WD-40 or PB Blaster generously around the bolt so it flows downward into the nut. Let it sit for one hour.
– When removing the bolt, back it out 2 turns, tighten it 1 turn. Repeat the process to get the bolt out slowly. Back and forth and back and forth to work the rust out. If you feel too much resistance, stop, apply WD-40 or PB Blaster and wait. This is similar to tapping a new thread (same idea).

2. The shock mount bolt is M8 x 1.25 x 30. Get a four (4) bolts at hardware store (or Volvo dealer) beforehand. Get four (4) M8 nuts in case the factory nut is stripped.


3. I use Bilstein TC Shock Absorber ($58/each) and Volvo Shock Mount (Corteco, $24/each). Got all my parts at http://www.rmeuropean.com. FYI, Bilstein Struts/Shocks are L.T. warranteed.
Very happy with the ride (I also have Bilstein TC as the Front Struts).

4. Torque values:
– Shock Absorber Top Nut: 40 Nm
– Shock Mount Bolt: 25 Nm
– Shock Absorber Bottom Nut: 80 Nm

5. You need an offset wrench (17-mm) for the Shock Absorber Nut. Sears carries this offset wrench! Another choice is Air Tool but be careful not to apply too much force, the shaft can spin and damage the absorber seal.

Procedure

1. Car in Park, Apply Hand Brake. Chock Front wheels!

2. Jack the Rear and place Jackstand under the subframe (where the delta control arms is attached to). Yes Jackstand under the subframe, and not under the control arms.

3. Open the trunk, remove flooring material. The Cover is held by four (4) 10-mm bolts, 2 on each side. Once this is removed the Shock Mount is in plain sight:
98-Volvo-RearShock-01.jpg

This is the setup: the bolt goes down. The nut is welded to the chassis:
98-Volvo-RearShock-02.jpg

5. If you replace both Shock Absorber and Shock Mount, no need to remove the single Shock Absorber Nut. Just loosen the 12-mm Bolts holding the shock mount, again read my tip above (Spray WD-40 or PB Blaster and work very slowly, back and forth many times to loosen the rust!!!).

6. The lower part of the Shock Absorber is held by an 18-mm nut.

7. To remove the Shock Absorber, jack gently under the Rear Spring to release tension on the Shock Absorber.
98-Volvo-RearShock-03.jpg

8. During Shock Absorber and Shock Mount assembly, note this sequence. From Top to Bottom:
– Large 17-mm Nut
– Large Washer
– Shock Mount
– Protective Sleeve
– Small washer (Bilstein provides this small washer)

9. Assemble the new Shock Absorber and Shock Mount outside of the car. It is much easier this way. Use the offset wrench and an adjustable wrench to hold the Shock Bolt. Tighten to 40 Nm.
98-Volvo-RearShock-04.jpg

10. Insert the new assembly into the car, install the 2 bolts loosely. Get under the car and attach the Lower part of the Shock Absorber using the 18-mm nut, do not tighten this 18-mm nut yet. Go back above and tighten the 12-mm mount nuts to 25 Nm. Then tighten the Lower 18-mm Nut to 80 Nm.

If you follow this DIY, it will be straightforward. Avoid breaking the bolt/nut at all cost!!! I spent 3h extracting the broken bolt!!! Anyway good luck and have fun, you will like the new ride from Bilstein TC!!!

Congrats, you just saved some money on labor for this easy job!

AFTER THOUGHTS

I search the different forums before doing this and I knew the nut/bolt on the mount is tricky and even so I broke one bolt off!!!

Having done this, my best advices for people are:
1. Get extra bolts and M8 nuts on hand.
2. Spray the bolts with WD-40 or PB Blaster 24-48h before doing this job.
This allows the lubricant to drip down into the nut’s threads.
3. Then remove the bolt as mentioned above, 2 turns CCW and 1 turn CW.
Apply WD-40 or PB Blaster, wait 15 min.
Repeat the process as if you tap new threads using tap and die set.

Having said that, if you run into:

1. Broken bolt:
This was my nightmare, it took forever to extract the stud. Solutions:
a. Vice-grip to grab the stud and undo it.
b. Drill the stud out but you risk damaging the nut’s thread.
If you stripped the nut’s thread (but still welded in place):
– You can drill it larger for the bolt to pass through, then use another nut below it.

2. Broken Nut off the welding spot:
This is actually easier to handle than broken stud!
Working through the rear pass door, just place another nut below then install the bolt.
You may need another assistant to help you hold the nut while you tighten the bolt.

DIY: 1998 Volvo V70 Rear Shock Absorber Replacement

1 Comment

[…] Volvo V70 Rear Shock Replacement TutorialAn excellent write-up for replacing rear shocks on 1993-2000 Volvo 850/V70/S70/C70. This happens to be for 1998 Volvo V70 Rear Shock Absorber + Mount. NOTE: 1. The trickiest part of this job is in the bolt holding the Shock Mount. These bolts were rusted through and I broke one of them (it took 3 hours to get the stud out!). Learned my lesson, and the rest is easy. The Nut is welded to the chassis. – Once the car is safely on jack stand. From underneath apply some grease on the Bolt part below the nut. This way when the bolt is removed, the grease is sucked into the nut. – Spray the top of these bolts with WD-40 or PB Blaster. Let it sit for 30 minutes. Go and do something else in the… […]

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