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Looking under your car...should you do it? (98 S70, N/A)

Help, Advice and DIY Tutorials on Volvo's extremely popular car line -- Volvo's 1990s "bread and butter" cars -- powered by the ubiquitous and durable Volvo inline 5-cylinder engine.

1992 - 1997 850, 850 R, 850 T5-R, 850 T5, 850 GLT
1997 - 2000 S70, S70 AWD
1997 - 2000 V70, V70 AWD
1997 - 2000 V70-XC
1997 - 2004 C70

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theWIFES_S70
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Re: Looking under your car...should you do it? (98 S70, N/A)

Post by theWIFES_S70 » Tue Feb 23, 2016 10:13 am

benpineapple wrote:I agree with everyone else, focus on power steering lines, then the exhaust cleanup.
The power steering job is a big gooey mess, no? :roll:

I'll keep an eye on it and plan for it sometime in the coming season. (If of course, the car starts!)


1998 Volvo S70, N/A, 5-speed, 183K
2007 Volvo S40, 2.4i, 5-speed, 97K

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Re: Looking under your car...should you do it? (98 S70, N/A)

Post by benpineapple » Tue Feb 23, 2016 1:49 pm

theWIFES_S70 wrote:
benpineapple wrote:I agree with everyone else, focus on power steering lines, then the exhaust cleanup.
The power steering job is a big gooey mess, no? :roll:

I'll keep an eye on it and plan for it sometime in the coming season. (If of course, the car starts!)
Well, hopefully not too gooey, if the system is internally clean. If you can make your own power steering lines and fittings, great, but buying the premade/prebent ones is VERY expensive. I had a power steering line leak on my 1990 240, and the particular lines were something like $250 from Volvo. Instead, I took it to a local transmission shop, they made their own, and I was out the door for around $120. $15 of that on the bill was for parts haha


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1998 V70 AWD [RIP at 249,255M]
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Re: Looking under your car...should you do it? (98 S70, N/A)

Post by theWIFES_S70 » Tue Feb 23, 2016 5:13 pm

benpineapple wrote:Well, hopefully not too gooey, if the system is internally clean. If you can make your own power steering lines and fittings, great, but buying the premade/prebent ones is VERY expensive. I had a power steering line leak on my 1990 240, and the particular lines were something like $250 from Volvo. Instead, I took it to a local transmission shop, they made their own, and I was out the door for around $120. $15 of that on the bill was for parts haha
Wow, that sounds like the kind of shop that should be in a Volvo database or something! I never thought about trying to fabricate your own power steering lines... hmmmm


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Re: Looking under your car...should you do it? (98 S70, N/A)

Post by benpineapple » Wed Feb 24, 2016 6:51 am

www.westsideservice.net Holland, MI

Transmission lines have 4 years and 50K on them, looking great. I don't think its all that rare to make power steering lines. I think brake lines are way different and harder to do because of the higher pressure and extreme heat generated by the brake system. If I recall correctly (this was a while ago) the lines were fabricated out of brass, with all solid brass fittings.


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1998 V70 AWD [RIP at 249,255M]
1990 240 [SOLD at 220xxxM]

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Re: Looking under your car...should you do it? (98 S70, N/A)

Post by abscate » Wed Feb 24, 2016 7:08 am

You really should be able to make these yourself for the cost of a swage tool (about 50 bucks) and 1/4 or 6mm tube.

Typical peak power steering pump pressure is 1200 psi spike at end travel, nominal working pressure 200-300 psi

Rating of compression fittings for 1/4 inch tube is about 3500 psi with 4:1 safety margin.

Cost of 10 feet 6mm stainless tube is probably about 50 USD, mild steel 1/3 of that.

The only place that sees high pressure is between the pump and steering rack by the way. Everything else doesn't even need to be swaged or compression fitted.

The PS pump pressure is even higher than the brake line pressure typically, Ive made lots of brake lines for VW rather than pay the MFG prices for cheap crap.


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Re: Looking under your car...should you do it? (98 S70, N/A)

Post by theWIFES_S70 » Wed Feb 24, 2016 10:18 am

abscate wrote:You really should be able to make these yourself for the cost of a swage tool (about 50 bucks) and 1/4 or 6mm tube.

Typical peak power steering pump pressure is 1200 psi spike at end travel, nominal working pressure 200-300 psi

Rating of compression fittings for 1/4 inch tube is about 3500 psi with 4:1 safety margin.

Cost of 10 feet 6mm stainless tube is probably about 50 USD, mild steel 1/3 of that.

The only place that sees high pressure is between the pump and steering rack by the way. Everything else doesn't even need to be swaged or compression fitted.

The PS pump pressure is even higher than the brake line pressure typically, I've made lots of brake lines for VW rather than pay the MFG prices for cheap crap.
abscate, thanks for the suggestion!

Looking closely at the flared end and the compression fitting, it doesn't look too complicated...

Three tools I don't have but wouldn't mind having!
- A swage tool for crimping the tubing to the rubber hose;
- A tube bending tool for making the turns (I have bent copper pipes before, this is a lot harder, right?);
- and, A flare end tool for the end on the high pressure side.

Definitely sounds like more "fun" than spending $260 on OEM hoses!! :mrgreen:


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Re: Looking under your car...should you do it? (98 S70, N/A)

Post by oragex » Wed Feb 24, 2016 3:14 pm

theWIFES_S70 wrote:Thank you all for the replies. I was having a crises of "Volvo faith" last night. In my head, I keep saying, "replace everything, and then the car will last 500,000 miles!"

This way of thinking will cost you a lot of money. I did so on a previous car and now thinking, it was not worth that money, not to mention time.

At this age, I would carefully inspect most components, such as suspension, pulleys, exhaust, springs, fuel/brake/steering lines -as you did with the pictures. If anything seems deeply rusted I would replace it. If it only has surface rust, I won't touch it but try to cover it with some rust protector. I did so on the power steering lines which are prone to rust and sometimes will start leaking. But if it's only surface rust, some rust protection will help these last another 5 years. That bulk after the catalyser may be a previous welding. Scratch the rust and see if there are layers of rust coming off. It so, it's better to bring it to a muffler shop, it might save a surprise one day while traveling or having a busy schedule.

A thorough inspection is the best thing. Last week I heard my exhaust pipe growling and this week I had a look and the two bolts that were connecting the catalyser to the first muffler almost felt into my hand. This is the kind of thing that can be detected on a preventive inspection.



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Re: Looking under your car...should you do it? (98 S70, N/A)

Post by theWIFES_S70 » Wed Feb 24, 2016 9:07 pm

oragex wrote:This way of thinking will cost you a lot of money. I did so on a previous car and now thinking, it was not worth that money, not to mention time.

At this age, I would carefully inspect most components, such as suspension, pulleys, exhaust, springs, fuel/brake/steering lines -as you did with the pictures. If anything seems deeply rusted I would replace it. If it only has surface rust, I won't touch it but try to cover it with some rust protector. I did so on the power steering lines which are prone to rust and sometimes will start leaking. But if it's only surface rust, some rust protection will help these last another 5 years. That bulk after the catalyser may be a previous welding. Scratch the rust and see if there are layers of rust coming off. It so, it's better to bring it to a muffler shop, it might save a surprise one day while traveling or having a busy schedule.

A thorough inspection is the best thing. Last week I heard my exhaust pipe growling and this week I had a look and the two bolts that were connecting the catalyser to the first muffler almost felt into my hand. This is the kind of thing that can be detected on a preventive inspection.
We're at approximately $1 per mile driven thus far! I will definitely heed caution from here on out. If I get her back on the road I'll take the S70 to a muffler shop and see what can be done and for how much. I'd like to get as new flex pipe, cat and muffler put in. (Just hope they don't knock loose that exhaust manifold!)

oragex, what did you use for rust removal, prevention? Amazon has something called Loctite Naval Jelly (http://www.amazon.com/Loctite-553472-Fl ... AXH8NSBAXC) and just a can of VHT (http://www.amazon.com/VHT-SP229-Rust-Co ... ibitor#Ask)?


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Re: Looking under your car...should you do it? (98 S70, N/A)

Post by oragex » Thu Feb 25, 2016 2:23 am

That sounds interesting if a little hard to properly apply given the tight spaces when it comes to ps lines, but I would give it a try to clean the rust (it seems it softens the rust which then has to be cleaned with a brush)

This also works to protect clean/rusted metal
http://www.amazon.com/Rust-Oleum-215215 ... B001DEL6J6

and there is also this although again not the easiest to apply
http://www.amazon.com/POR-15-Rust-Preve ... B000GGMLQY



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Re: Looking under your car...should you do it? (98 S70, N/A)

Post by abscate » Thu Feb 25, 2016 4:05 am

The only connectors that you need are the high pressure fittings on the steering rack and the power steering pump. if those are reusable you can flare fit in replacement tuning in between and duplicate the Volvo hose easily enough for a lot less money. Alternatively, hit up one of the warm dry weather states guys to hit the PnP for you.

Every thing else you can flare fit and the low pressure hoses can just be rubber on metal with standard clamps to return the low pressure oil to the pump.

Bending 1/4 dimension tube is easy, you don't need a tubing bender, you can go down to Lowes and use their large diameter PVC sewer pipes as bending jigs, They don't mind, really.


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