70 series door handle locking tumbler rod replacement

Help, Advice and DIY Tutorials on Volvo's extremely popular car line -- Volvo's 1990s "bread and butter" cars -- powered by the ubiquitous and durable Volvo inline 5-cylinder engine.

1992 - 1997 850, 850 R, 850 T5-R, 850 T5, 850 GLT
1997 - 2000 S70, S70 AWD
1997 - 2000 V70, V70 AWD
1997 - 2000 V70-XC
1997 - 2004 C70

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CIK7  
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Year and Model: 1996 960 Saloon
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70 series door handle locking tumbler rod replacement

Post by CIK7 »

This is a task that requires EXTREME patience and precision. I broke and then replaced the rod on the locking tumbler on my XC early this year and forgot to take pictures and make a post for it. So here it is at least 6 months late. I am making this on request for a fellow MVS member. I apologize for anyone that had/has this issue and did not find the solution on MVS.
Go to the junkyard and buy a 70 series door handle. I do not know if 850 models are compatible. Research it.
Here are the pictures with instructional CAPTIONS. I also apologize they are not in order from top to bottom. They ARE in order from bottom to top. Let me know if this helped y'all.
Attachments
Once you have completed all steps, the tumbler should appear like when you started.
Once you have completed all steps, the tumbler should appear like when you started.
This is the MOST tedious part of replace process. Be sure to rotate the spring according to which spring arm will be loaded first. Insert rod assembly so first spring arm is loaded. You will need 1 or 2 tools to pry the spring arms back on the metal hook thing.
This is the MOST tedious part of replace process. Be sure to rotate the spring according to which spring arm will be loaded first. Insert rod assembly so first spring arm is loaded. You will need 1 or 2 tools to pry the spring arms back on the metal hook thing.
Now you are ready to install the new rod. All pieces that you dealt with during removal.
Now you are ready to install the new rod. All pieces that you dealt with during removal.
Rotate the rod 90° and completely pull it back through the metal hook thing and separate.
Rotate the rod 90° and completely pull it back through the metal hook thing and separate.
Turn removed rod assembly upside down as shown. Push the rod through the metal hook thing. You will find a black rubber piece on the end; remove that and set aside.
Turn removed rod assembly upside down as shown. Push the rod through the metal hook thing. You will find a black rubber piece on the end; remove that and set aside.
Pry up rod assembly gently with 2-3 fingers on base of rod shaft. The spring underneath will release out of place. Removal of spring is optional.
Pry up rod assembly gently with 2-3 fingers on base of rod shaft. The spring underneath will release out of place. Removal of spring is optional.
NOTE the spring clip with 2 holes in it. Brace 1 side and use a skinny prying tool to pry other side to remove clip from tumbler assembly.
NOTE the spring clip with 2 holes in it. Brace 1 side and use a skinny prying tool to pry other side to remove clip from tumbler assembly.
Here is the locking tumbler before disassembly.
Here is the locking tumbler before disassembly.
1996 960 Saloon (2nd owner, Mi:140205, The Cloud)
1998 V70 XC black (Mi:143,995/151K, The Storm)
1998 V70 XC white ($50, junk, getting crushed soon)
2001 V70 Ba white (bad solenoid, traded for Storm)

Plans for The Storm: universal enclosed trailer with fusebox and unique climate control system.

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Cookeh
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Year and Model: 1996 Volvo 850 T5
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Post by Cookeh »

This was a simple 1 minute job when I did it to show another member how to replace broken rods. Remove the cylinder from the handle first, then its easy to get circlip pliers in there and the whole thing falls apart. Leaving it in the handle certainly complicates things and costs far more time and effort than removing the cylinder.

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