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99 S70 - Time for a timing belt, and other things...

Help, Advice and DIY Tutorials on Volvo's extremely popular car line -- Volvo's 1990s "bread and butter" cars -- powered by the ubiquitous and durable Volvo inline 5-cylinder engine.

1992 - 1997 850, 850 R, 850 T5-R, 850 T5, 850 GLT
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krenekj
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99 S70 - Time for a timing belt, and other things...

Post by krenekj » Tue Nov 03, 2009 1:20 pm

My 99 S70 (non-turbo) just turned 100k, and I'm preparing to change the timing belt in the next few weeks. I've done all of the standard maintenance on my vehicles over the years, but this will be my first timing belt and probably the most invasive service I've ever done.

The forum posts have been great preparation and I still have a few questions:

1. My engine has variable valve timing. Do I need to worry about this any differently than an engine w/o VVT? Can I just secure the cam cogs and be done? I understand there is a special tool to lock the cams with VVT, but do I need to do that? Can it be done w/o the tool?

2. While I've got everything apart, I plan to replace the pulley, tensioner and water pump. What are the various torque specs for tightening the bolts?

4. Should I use any type of anti-seize or thread-lock on any of the fasteners when re-assembling?

5. Are there other preventative things I should consider doing while I have that side of the engine apart?

6. Any other suggestions?

Thanks again for any comments and help,
Jeff



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Re: 99 S70 - Time for a timing belt, and other things...

Post by MadeInJapan » Tue Nov 03, 2009 3:48 pm

The main difference is that when you turn your engine clockwise, you need to go past the upper marks by 1/4 of a turn AND THEN GO BACK Counter clockwise to the marks before you take the belt off. I'm providing a pdf from VADIS that details things better.
99 S70 Timing Belt.pdf
(190.95 KiB) Downloaded 1204 times
Btw, you don't need anti-seize. Just take your time and you'll do fine!


'98 S70 T5 Emrld Grn Met/Beige Tons of Upgrades Mobil-1
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Re: 99 S70 - Time for a timing belt, and other things...

Post by krenekj » Thu Nov 12, 2009 10:28 am

I recently completed this job, and want to thank those on this forum for their advice and posts. None of this would be possible without your collective help.

In case you're interested, here are some thoughts and insights on the work I did. None of it is new, but repeating what others have suggested may help give folks confidence to accomplish these tasks.

99 S70 N/A, non-turbo, MT, 101k

I set out to do a number of things:
- timing belt, tensioner, idler pulley
- water pump, coolant flush, thermostat
- accessory belt

With the exception of the acc belt, I had never done any of these items myself. I'm reasonably good with mechanical things, and like to solve puzzles, so I felt pretty confident I could accomplish the service with help from the forum.

The time between opening the hood and taking a test drive was about 6 hours working time. I hit a few speed bumps, but overall things went well. Here are some observations and thoughts:

- The vibration damper does not need to come off. However, you do need to remove a small black plastic cover around the bottom of the crankshaft (2 bolts). It's there to keep dust/dirt off the TB.

- Before removing the TB, I marked where the cam gear marks intersected with the TB, and transferred those marks to the new TB. This ensured I had the same number of teeth between cam gears.

- Sliding the TB off was difficult because of a bolt that comes close the back of the vibration damper, near the bottom. So, I cut the belt off, hoping I could slide a new one on. This was a huge leap of faith.

- Putting the new TB on took a bit of effort, but I was able to get a good angle to get it past the bolt (described above) and the back of the damper. This took about 5 min of wrestling, all done while laying on my back. I had a big sigh of relief after this step.

- The pulley and tensioner were a piece of cake. No issues there.

- Most time was spent getting the TB on the tensioner (this is the last part on which to thread the TB). Of course a new TB does not want to give, and it took over 30 minutes just to wrestle this on. One thing that helped was to ensure I had good tenion in the belt from the crank to the intake gear, and then exhaust gear. Keeping that tight, gives some extra slack around the water pump and just enough play to force the belt onto the tensioner. This is generally followed by a big smile because you are in the home stretch.

- Adjusting the mechanical tensioner seemed all too easy.

- The water pump was easier than expected. I did not anticipate the amount of fluid that would rush out, but there is enough to make a mess of things. Be prepared to capture the runoff .

- You'll need to clean the off the water pump's old gasket residue from the engine block. I found it easy to use some high grit sand paper (400+) to GENTLY clean things up a bit.

- Putting the water pump back on, with a new gasket, requires some hand gymnastics, but it can be done. There are two pins on the engine block that help register both the gasket and water pump.

- Be sure to torque all bolts correctly. I was surprised how little force was required for some items, like the water pump. If I was doing this w/o a torque wrench, I probably would have easily over done it.

- Stay organized so you can easily find your tools and parts without a lot of searching. It helps remove the anxiety later when wondering if there was anything you may have forgotten to put back, or take out.

After bolting everything together, filling with coolant, I cautiously started the car. It turned over immediately, and nicely purred. It let it idle on the jack stands until it heated up, and checked all my work. I've driven about 50 miles so far, and no problems. The car sounds great, and I have the confidence to tackle the many items that I know will be coming up now that the car has hit 100k, and my kids will soon begin driving.

Thanks.



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Re: 99 S70 - Time for a timing belt, and other things...

Post by MadeInJapan » Thu Nov 12, 2009 4:02 pm

Good job!! :)


'98 S70 T5 Emrld Grn Met/Beige Tons of Upgrades Mobil-1
'04 V70 2.5T Red/Taupe Some Upgrades Mobil-1
'07 S40 T5 AWD 6 speed manual! Silver/Black Stage1 Heico & Elevate
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Re: 99 S70 - Time for a timing belt, and other things...

Post by LamboSE5 » Sat Feb 11, 2012 6:58 am

krenekj wrote:- The pulley and tensioner were a piece of cake. No issues there.
MadeInJapan wrote:99 S70 Timing Belt.pdf
I looked through PDF.. I remember asking in an active thread here "I heard there was a temperature sensitive factor to the TB job..." and everyone said no, or they hadn't heard of it.

I'm spending a lot of time searching the web in general. And now searching the database here (TB category, then S70 category) and not finding much on how the Mechanical Tensioner needs to be installed properly.
Thing is - even the PDF there, it's for mechanics...that have done tons of timing belts and at least seen these parts and know the nomenclature etc etc..



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Re: 99 S70 - Time for a timing belt, and other things...

Post by krenekj » Wed Aug 14, 2019 9:04 am

My 99 S70 is still kicking and just turned 200k this year. So I decided to tackle the TB again and thank goodness for this forum and thread history! This time I did not change the water pump, only the TB, idle pulley and tensioner all with Volvo OE. Here are some observations:

- I used the same procedure - did not remove the balancer, but still had to cut the old TB to get it off.

- to remove the small lower plastic cover behind the balancer, there are two 10mm bolts. To get to these, you need to remove the front and rear screws holding the fuel line in place. The front is T25, and the rear is 10mm bolt. This gives enough play in the fuel line to move it out of the way and remove the small plastic cover that enables you to slide the timing belt onto the crank.

- Getting the new TB back over the tensioner was much easier this time because I figured out how to use the eccentric key to pull all tension out and the TB just slid right on. This was a huge time savings.

- In all, I spent about 2 hours which I think was pretty fast but I had done it previously and had it all planned out.

- The old components (TB, pulley, tensioner) were in great shape - I could have probably gone at least another 10k-20k, but that's not surprising.

That's all for now - questions/comments always welcome.

Thanks!


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Re: 99 S70 - Time for a timing belt, and other things...

Post by abscate » Wed Aug 14, 2019 10:33 am

Im interested in which VVT you have on your non-Turbo 1999 S70

We have had fights over this model year - the lore here is

1999 NA - no VVT
1999 Turbo Exhaust VVT
2000 NA Intake VVT
2000 Turbo Exhaust VVT

Maybe you have a late model year 1999 with Intake VVT?

Thats my final answer!


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Re: 99 S70 - Time for a timing belt, and other things...

Post by krenekj » Wed Aug 14, 2019 11:14 am

I've always assumed mine has VVT. My intake cam has a couple wires coming off the driver's side of the engine. My car was built in late 98 and I took delivery in March 99. See below:

IMG_1375.jpg


93 240 Wagon
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02 V70 NA
18 V90CC T5P*

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Re: 99 S70 - Time for a timing belt, and other things...

Post by abscate » Wed Aug 14, 2019 11:47 am

Need to see the other end of the cams with the cover removed, to see if it has solenoids on the 'front' end of the engine (passenger side of car in the States)

Im going to guess you don't have that on the B5244S engine (?)


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Re: 99 S70 - Time for a timing belt, and other things...

Post by Eddystone » Wed Aug 14, 2019 12:11 pm

krenekj wrote:
Tue Nov 03, 2009 1:20 pm

1. My engine has variable valve timing. Do I need to worry about this any differently than an engine w/o VVT? Can I just secure the cam cogs and be done? I understand there is a special tool to lock the cams with VVT, but do I need to do that? Can it be done w/o the tool?
Jeff,

I did a timing belt on an S40 which is essentially the identical job.

You DEFINITELY want to purchase a decent tool for locking the cam sprockets before the old timing belt is removed. If you don't lock those sprockets, the job will become a nightmare. Ask me how I know. I didn't know anything about VVT when I did the one I did. Had to install and reinstall the belt multiple times before I got it right.

There are several tools out there to immobilize the sprockets and I will leave it up to others to review those they have used.

The $20 tool at FCP indicates that it is only for use on cars without VVT so make sure you get the correct tool


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