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DIY: 98 V70 Brake Hydraulic Overhaul (Hoses, Seals, Parking)

Help, Advice and DIY Tutorials on Volvo's extremely popular car line -- Volvo's 1990s "bread and butter" cars -- powered by the ubiquitous and durable Volvo inline 5-cylinder engine.

1992 - 1997 850, 850 R, 850 T5-R, 850 T5, 850 GLT
1997 - 2000 S70, S70 AWD
1997 - 2000 V70, V70 AWD
1997 - 2000 V70-XC
1997 - 2004 C70

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mecheng
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Year and Model: 1998 Volvo S70 T5
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mecheng

Re: DIY: 98 V70 Brake Hydraulic Overhaul (Hoses, Seals, Park

Post by mecheng » Thu Sep 03, 2015 3:34 am

For those that bought the vice grip locking wrench, is the 4LW or 7LW better. I see from the link below the 4lw is for 7mm-14mm, so is it better for smaller sizes as the 7lw is for 11mm-19mm or does it matter for this job because the smallest size nut is 11mm correct?

http://www.irwin.com/uploads/products/b ... _eBook.pdf


1998 Volvo S70 T5 - SE - 240km - Sold July 2018
1997 Volvo 850 GLT - 190km
Boost is my drug of choice

mecheng
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Year and Model: 1998 Volvo S70 T5
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Re: DIY: 98 V70 Brake Hydraulic Overhaul (Hoses, Seals, Park

Post by mecheng » Fri Sep 04, 2015 10:49 am

mecheng wrote:For those that bought the vice grip locking wrench, is the 4LW or 7LW better. I see from the link below the 4lw is for 7mm-14mm, so is it better for smaller sizes as the 7lw is for 11mm-19mm or does it matter for this job because the smallest size nut is 11mm correct?

http://www.irwin.com/uploads/products/b ... _eBook.pdf
crickets.... any input?


1998 Volvo S70 T5 - SE - 240km - Sold July 2018
1997 Volvo 850 GLT - 190km
Boost is my drug of choice

pepsov
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pepsov

Re: DIY: 98 V70 Brake Hydraulic Overhaul (Hoses, Seals, Park

Post by pepsov » Wed Oct 07, 2015 9:13 pm

In preparation of a brake-hose job on a '99 V70 this weekend, I just went through the whole thread. Excellent material! Thanks to all contributors!

One technique that was not mentioned here is the "Vise-grip-over-flare-nut-wrench" where one uses the vise-grips to tighten the flare-nut wrench over the fragile brass nut. This way the nut cannot get damaged no matter how hard the grip.

I've used this successfully on a 25-year-old 740, but I have to admit that my flare-nut wrench was home made from a high quality (FACOM - yes, it did hurt to destroy the tool!) deep offset 6-point box wrench with a minimal cut to allow only the brake line through (normal flare-nut wrenches are made to be used on a hose/tube almost as thick as the nut, so they miss a larger section of the wall).
The point is - this being a box wrench instead of a flare, it had more flexibility, so the vice-grips could really squeeze it on top of the brass nut. Perhaps with a 'normal' flare this will not have any measurable effect.

And - yes, on one of the rear hoses I still HAD to use heat (propane torch). The rear hoses were still the original ones, not like the fronts which I replaced at 12-years :) Fortunately the car is a diesel, so I didn't have to worry about the whole flames-near-fuel-tank thing.



pepsov
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pepsov

Re: DIY: 98 V70 Brake Hydraulic Overhaul (Hoses, Seals, Park

Post by pepsov » Wed Oct 07, 2015 10:09 pm

"...deep offset 6-point box wrench with a minimal cut to allow only the brake line through..."
I mean cutting one of the corners of this:
http://www.mytoolstore.com/sk/sk03155.html
or this:
http://toolguyd.com/facom-angled-socket-wrench-review/



pepsov
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pepsov

Re: DIY: 98 V70 Brake Hydraulic Overhaul (Hoses, Seals, Park

Post by pepsov » Tue Oct 20, 2015 6:49 am

mecheng wrote:
mecheng wrote:For those that bought the vice grip locking wrench, is the 4LW or 7LW better. I see from the link below the 4lw is for 7mm-14mm, so is it better for smaller sizes as the 7lw is for 11mm-19mm or does it matter for this job because the smallest size nut is 11mm correct?

http://www.irwin.com/uploads/products/b ... _eBook.pdf
crickets.... any input?
I've just completed the brake hose job. I can confirm that the Irwin 4LW is just fine for the 11mm nut. It does feel a little bit smallish at first, but then you realize that this is good, because it works better in small spaces.

I did feel like needing extensions on both the 14mm flare and on the 4LW, but in the end did not use any, because I had the feeling the 11mm nut is starting to get rounded (alas, the 4LW is not a magic wrench, its just much better than a flare). In the end I had to use heat on one of the hoses - just a simple BBQ lighter did the job. Released the bracket from the fender, released the spring that pushes against the 11mm flare (so that the heat is not lost), heated the joint for a minute or so, then sprayed PB blaster. Repeated it 3 times and the nut was able to turn.

After so many years of doing this job I'm still baffled as to who came up with this strange design, where the smaller nut is made of brass and the larger of steel. Shouldn't it be the opposite?



cn90
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Re: DIY: 98 V70 Brake Hydraulic Overhaul (Hoses, Seals, Park

Post by cn90 » Tue Oct 20, 2015 8:18 am

No the brass nut design so one does not damage the expensive part, which is the metal line.
Hose is the cheap part and needs to be replaced. The metal line, if well cared for (spray water during Spring to get rid of winter salt), will last the life of the car.

Anyway, as mentioned a dremel on the brass nut is another trick.


2004 V70 2.5T 100K+
2005 XC90 2.5T 110K+

JimBee
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Re: DIY: 98 V70 Brake Hydraulic Overhaul (Hoses, Seals, Parking)

Post by JimBee » Sun Dec 01, 2019 7:55 pm

If your caliper piston isn't perfect after cleaning (and soaking overnight in 90% alcohol to remove any invisible residue) there's a good chance it will leak. You can get a complete kit from a UK source for $38.00 shipped (in 2017).

Source: http://www.biggreddemo.auto-guru.uk/

I bought one just to have in inventory. Piston appears high quality, heavy like OEM and fully chromed. Kit comes with seals, etc. Plus, you might get giddy when you look at the colorful calipers they offer.

cn90 has a technique for installing the front caliper piston with the dust boot on the piston that seems simple enough. The problem I ran into when I tried to do it was when the dust boot is stretched onto the piston, its ring/seal that fits into the groove/seat inside the bore has a larger circumference than the bore. So the piston will start into the bore but the dust boot ring/seal stops on the face of the caliper.

Alternatively, you can start the dust boot onto the piston and set the outward dust boot ring into its groove in the piston, then stretch the dust boot to set its ring/seal into its groove in the caliper. Then the dust boot needs to be stretched over the inner (lead) end of the piston to fully insert the piston. But with the inner end of the piston up against the face of the caliper, aligned with the bore, there's no way (that I could see) to stretch the boot over the inner end of the piston. Trying to force the piston through the boot just cuts through the boot. I tried a couple of ways to do that without success because the inner end of the piston is solid and blocks the point (bore entry) where the dust boot needs to be stretched. You can't get around it to stretch it over the piston—even you did have access, the boot rubber is very strong and tough to stretch; but that's a moot issue because you can't access the lead end of the piston to stretch the boot.

Frustrating, because you can get all the way to that point with all new parts and the piston together with the dust boot won't insert....

...UNLESS: You have a stretcher cone on which to mount the dust boot. Here's the stretcher cone I made:
Dust_boot_stretcher_cone.jpg
Dustboot stretcher cone dimensions:
diameter at narrow end (butting up to face of caliper): ~60 mm; 2 3/8"
diameter of wider end: ~ 63 mm; 2 7/16"

Here it is with a dust boot stretched on:
dust boot_on_stretcher_cone.jpg
The leading edge of the dust boot has a rim seal that has to seat into a groove just inside the caliper bore. Making sure everything's lubed up with SylGlyde?, you can lead the boot's rim seal off the edge of the stretcher cone and press it into its respective groove (which you have cleaned out with a Dremel and wire wheel)—taking care not to let the rest of the boot slip off the cone.

(The main piston seal is already installed.)

Now the boot is open enough to lead the lubed piston through the boot and into the bore. Using firm pressure, go ahead and push the piston in through the main seal, making sure the boot is not slipping off the cone—if it does the piston will cleave off whatever part of the boot is in the way. You need to get the piston in far enough that the boot will fully slide onto the piston when you remove the cone. It worked well for me.

Caution: If you look carefully at my closeup of the boot on the cone, you can see that the boot got a little scuffed. I just put that one on dry for the picture and probably wouldn't use it.

The last part of the boot installation, is the outer-more rim seal of the boot that slips into its respective groove on the piston.

And here's what I made it from:
donor_cup_for_stretcher_cone.jpg
The composite coffee cup looks like maybe a mix of paper and plastic. I tried several plastic cups but they weren't substantial enough to hold the strong elastic force of the dust boot. Dollar Tree sells the one I used: 2 for a dollar.

You have to hold the work piece while you use a fine tooth hack saw to cut out a section. I used a self threading screw and screwed the base of the cup to the face of a 2 x 4, held on edge. Then just saw off the upper part first, finish with the lower part.

You can see that I trimmed down the upper part so the piston could be easily set in the caliper breach.

To scribe the cutting lines around the cup, I stretched a wide rubber band like they use on produce up around the cup then traced a line with a Sharpie around the edge of the band.

Brake lines.
Also, rather than fight with those seized rear caliper fittings—which you will have to do if the pistons are corroded—I finally decided to replace the lines. cn90 is right that no way are you going to crack loose the fittings at the crossover flex hose mounted on the transverse suspension arms. Their fate is sealed. No problem: just replace the lines from the splitter in front of the left rear wheel (those fittings always crack loose effortlessly on the p80's) to the rear calipers. You'll have new fittings and will never again have to struggle with rounded fitting points.

However, before you begin: you'll need to determine if you can loosen the two screws that hold on the flex hose brackets (one in each bracket). I did this total replacement on all 3 of my 850's and got 5 of the 6 screws out, without difficulty. They're titanium, T25 or 27. They won't be rusty but they have thread-lock so can be tough to crack and not easy to reach. I pulled the rear shocks to drop the suspension arms a little more, which gave me enough access.

I took a hack saw to the bracket whose screw wouldn't come loose. Volvo sells those brackets, I think it was around $13.00. Each bracket has the one screw and a locating pin, so if you have to saw off the bracket and the screw you can use a large band clamp to hold on the new bracket—the locating pin will keep it in place. The rest of the hardware was all good.

This supplier has what you'll need. They're internationally known.
https://brakeandequipment.com/

You'll need to measure your brake lines (add an inch). Order the "easy bend" variety. Made of a copper amalgam. Plenty sturdy but can be formed by hand. They'll arrive with new fittings installed, ball end flares, ready to install.

The fitting thread pitch is 1.0 x 10mm (check that will Volvo parts)

They also supply the Centric brand crossover flex hose. Quality looks good. Never fight with those rear caliper fittings again!

To shape the new lines just clamp down the old line and bend the new lines accordingly. Reassembly of the whole thing is easy.

To minimize fluid loss you can pick up a short 1.0 x 10mm bolt to screw into the splitter block. Maybe wrap it with teflon tape. Any lines downstream from there will just leak out what's in that part of the line. I've bought them from NAPA.

And definitely invest in the 4LW V-jaw vice grip. I long ago gave up on flare nut wrenches for any underbody fittings:
https://www.acetool.com/Vise-Grip-4LW-4 ... &gclsrc=ds
donor_cup_for_stretcher_cone.jpg
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