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Why Bosch LSU wide-band air/fuel ratio (or Lambda) sensors fail so often in aftermarket performance applications

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matthew1
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Why Bosch LSU wide-band air/fuel ratio (or Lambda) sensors fail so often in aftermarket performance applications

Post by matthew1 » Sun Jan 28, 2018 11:44 am

http://www.nzefi.com/bosch-lsu-wide-ban ... lications/
Bosch is the world’s leading manufacturer of exhaust gas oxygen sensors. Their LSU range of wide-band sensors has been widely adopted by the OEMs and can be found on a huge number of production vehicles to accurately measure Lambda or the air/fuel ratio (AFR) in the exhaust system. Their common use as a mass-produced part has driven the cost of these sensors down significantly over the years and they have become very popular in the after-market performance tuning industry. We also, know that these sensors live in the harshest environment of all automotive sensors, but even so they have been designed with this in mind. On production vehicles it is common for these sensors to last for over well over 100,000kms. Yet in aftermarket performance installations it isn’t uncommon to hear of LSU sensors lasting for much shorter periods of time and in some cases failing very quickly. This article attempts to explain why this is. We’ll do this without getting into complex explanations of how these sensors work and all of the concepts discussed will be pretty easy for anyone to grasp. However, it isn’t a short article, so if you don’t feel like reading the whole thing then feel free to jump to the bullet points at the end. Once you understand how to avoid the common mistakes you should be able to get much better life out of these sensors.
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matthew1
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matthew1

Re: Why Bosch LSU wide-band air/fuel ratio (or Lambda) sensors fail so often in aftermarket performance applications

Post by matthew1 » Sun Jan 28, 2018 11:52 am

Our recommendation

To get the best life out of your wide-band lambda sensors, we recommend the following:
  • Consider using a controller that is either integrated into an ECU or one that receives an engine speed input via a wired input or over CAN bus. Options meeting this criteria include the Link G4+ Fury, G4+ Thunder, or using Link’s external CAN-Lambda controller with a suitable ECU.
  • If using a stand-alone controller without an engine speed input, never let your controller heat the sensor prior to starting the engine. One way to guarantee this is to power the controller off of its own relay which is not turned on until after the engine is started.
  • Place your sensor less than 1m from the engine in a position upstream of any parts of the exhaust system where condensation is likely to pool or settle. In high exhaust gas temperature applications, consider using a longer heat-sink type sensor boss rather than moving the sensor further from the engine.
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1997 850 T5, MSD ignition coil, Hallman manual boost controller, injectors, R bumper, OMP strut brace [gone]
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