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Restore car paint

Help, Advice and DIY Tutorials on Volvo's extremely popular car line -- Volvo's 1990s "bread and butter" cars -- powered by the ubiquitous and durable Volvo inline 5-cylinder engine.

1992 - 1997 850, 850 R, 850 T5-R, 850 T5, 850 GLT
1997 - 2000 S70, S70 AWD
1997 - 2000 V70, V70 AWD
1997 - 2000 V70-XC
1997 - 2004 C70

JimBee
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Restore car paint

Post by JimBee » Wed Jun 05, 2019 7:45 pm

Is there a better place on MVS to post this? My 3 850's have paint issues. The 93—well, not sure what can be done there, except maybe a full repaint which is probably not worth it. The car runs well, starts immediately in cold weather. It's my winter beater. The hood and roof have major paint failure. I've treated rust spots on the roof with POR 15, inside and out which is holding off further deterioration.

Two 96's, one base, dark green still shines after a car wash/wax, and has no clear coat issues, but could use a nice cleaning and fussy polish. I've seen some Meguila's polishes (Harbor Freight has one on sale now). I replaced the hood with one that has just a few small pocks in the paint but is oxidized. What would be the best treatment to bring it to full lustre and protection?

My 96 with the best appearance inside and out is the turbo wagon, but does have clear coat failure on the hood and roof. Otherwise the paint is still in tact though is weathering, but no rust on those surfaces. What's the best protection going forward?

Suggestions appreciated!



Sommerfeldt
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Sommerfeldt

Re: Restore car paint

Post by Sommerfeldt » Wed Jun 05, 2019 10:32 pm

Clear coat repair is tricky, time consuming and very easy to mess up... you could sand down the edges of clear coat with 2000-2500 grit, then try to clear coat that whole panel again, but If the edges aren’t perfect, you will have troubles. There might also be a noticeable height difference.

For the ones with good clear coat, clean and degrease. Clay bar the whole thing. If you have swirls and scratches in it, use 2500 grit wet sand paper, sand super carefully by hand (no pressure/force) in straight lines 45 degrees, until all texture is gone. Then use something like the Turtle Wax pro polishing, high cut first, then down to the ultra fine stuff.

Finish with a good sealant. This is super important now that you’ve stripped everything resembling protection from the paint. :)
All at your own risk, of course. :)

- S
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'96 855 T5, R bumper and spoiler, Koni Yellows & blue H&R springs all 'round.

Cookeh
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Re: Restore car paint

Post by Cookeh » Thu Jun 06, 2019 1:01 pm

Wet sand to remove swirls is extremely unnecessary, wet sanding is a last ditch effort to remove orange peel or deep scratches. The whole point of paint correction is to use the least aggressive method possible. Jumping straight into the most aggressive is not good advice. Furthermore, removing wet-sanding marks by hand will take an absolute age, as will then correcting the compound marks.

Wash and then decontamination is good advice, but after that you can either invest in a good dual action polisher (Harbour Freight DA is cheap and good for you Americans) and then Meguiars 105 and 205. Assuming your paint isn't absolutely trashed you should be able to get a 80-90% improvement in swirls/marring without much trouble. If you do not want to invest in a DA then you are much more limited. You can use the same compound and polish but it will take forever and you'll be lucky to get a 50-60% improvement and your arm will probably drop clean off...! In this instance you are better off getting a good glaze product like Bilt Hamber Cleanser Polish. Not only will this remove some light marks and oxidation but it will also fill in and mask other defects.

Protection wise nothing is better than a ceramic treatment but doing this is above most home-users and so the next best bet is a good wax like Bilt Hamber Double Speed Wax or Poorboys Black Hole. They typically last for 3-4 months before needing to be reapplied. This can be extended if you use spray wax products as a drying aid when doing your maintenance washes.

Clear coat repair is indeed very tricky, generally, you are better off re-clearcoating the panel as a whole.
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JimBee
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Re: Restore car paint

Post by JimBee » Thu Jun 06, 2019 2:11 pm

The hood on my 96 burgundy color wagon has some broad streaks of missing clear coat. The paint now revealed isn't damaged but is getting sun bleached. If I want to prep it well and then re-clearcoat the whole hood (going over the remaining clearcoat) without stripping and redoing the paint and everything, would that work?

How would I proceed? I would probably have a pro do the clearcoat, but I would do the prep as much as possible. Does this make sense?

Also, the roof panel on that wagon has lost most of its clearcoat along both sides of the top and what remains is lifting towards the middle. I'm not too fussy about the looks of that panel but I would like to stabilize it to prevent further deterioration. Could I take the same approach there, just clearcoating over everything including the clear that's still bonded? Suggestions for this minimalist approach?

Also: what should I use for decontamination?

Thanks!



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Re: Restore car paint

Post by Cookeh » Thu Jun 06, 2019 2:50 pm

Decontamination at a minimum would require a clay bar. To get a greater level of decontamination and to make claying easier a good fallout remover and a good tar and glue remover before the claying stage will be the best option.

Regarding clear coating, yes, if you feather the edges of the clearcoat where it has failed and then wetsand the entire panel (something like 400grit, or even as high as 800) you should be able to clearcoat over the whole thing. It won't give the absolute best result but it should give you what you are looking for. I don't know what paintshops are like in the US but overhere you might struggle to find a painter that will do such a thing as they can't guarantee the work or give a reliable estimate as to how long it might last.

That being said, if the base coat is UV damaged or faded you will either have to polish the base to restore the cour, or if severe enough you will have to repaint the whole panel.



Sommerfeldt
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Re: Restore car paint

Post by Sommerfeldt » Thu Jun 06, 2019 4:46 pm

Cookeh wrote:
Thu Jun 06, 2019 1:01 pm
Wet sand to remove swirls is extremely unnecessary, wet sanding is a last ditch effort to remove orange peel or deep scratches. The whole point of paint correction is to use the least aggressive method possible. Jumping straight into the most aggressive is not good advice. Furthermore, removing wet-sanding marks by hand will take an absolute age, as will then correcting the compound marks.

Wash and then decontamination is good advice, but after that you can either invest in a good dual action polisher (Harbour Freight DA is cheap and good for you Americans) and then Meguiars 105 and 205.
This isn’t strictly accurate. I just did my whole roof in a Saturday afternoon, and mine’s an 855. I do have a good DA, and sanding did take most of the time, but polishing out 2500 grit goes seriously fast. Remember that all you’ve done is remove texture.

The resulting “haze” is easily removed by a high cut polish, then gloss is restored with the fine. Meg’s 105 and 205 is excellent for those two. I’d like to see you try to remove serious scratches with 2500 grit, btw - that grit is reserved for the finest swirls and orange peel.

Also... where are you if the compound and polish didn’t work? Square one with a piece of sandpaper in your hand, that’s where.

And again... remember the sealant.
Just to mention it - keep the 400 grit in the wood shop. I’d never take that kind of boulder paper to a car. Might as well pick up some gravel and rub it all over the paint.

- S


'96 855 T5, R bumper and spoiler, Koni Yellows & blue H&R springs all 'round.

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