IPD sale XeMODeX - Experts in Volvo Electronics
Did you know? 🤔
Logged in users can get email notification of topic replies Log in or register (free).
Amazon Link Buy your stuff using this and it helps MVS!

1992 Volvo 940 Non Turbo, Sedan, Overheating, Poor Shifting Issue

Help, Advice, Owners' Discussion and DIY Tutorials on all Volvo's "mid era" rear wheel drive Volvos.

1975 - 1993 240
1983 - 1992 740
1982 - 1991 760
1986 - 1991 780
1990 - 1998 940
1990 - 1998 960
1997 - 1998 V90/S90

bknockenhauer
Posts: 4
Joined: Mon Nov 26, 2018 8:05 am
Year and Model: 1990 740 GL
Location: Boston, MA
Has thanked: 0
Been thanked: 0
United States of America
bknockenhauer

1992 Volvo 940 Non Turbo, Sedan, Overheating, Poor Shifting Issue

Post by bknockenhauer » Thu Sep 12, 2019 2:18 pm

Hi All,

Just looking for a little confirmation about what I think is going on with my 1992 Volvo 740 Non Turbo Sedan.

I bought this car earlier this year after my 1990 740 was totalled, it's in amazing shape for its age and the fact that it's lived in New England its whole life. It's got about 165k on it, and was well maintained by its owners (with repair reciepts in the glove for pretty much it's whole life... Besides some corrosion and minor rust in the engine bay, this thing has been running beautifully since I got it.

One week ago I was driving to work and i noticed it was having a hard time shifting between first, second, third. My rpms would drop out/surge despite not moving my foot off the gas. Upon leaving, the car was slipping going into reverse, and I decided to drive home immediately (about 10 minutes tops). This is when I noticed that every time I stopped, the temp guage would pin basically to the red on the dial. As soon as I started moving again, it would be back to dead center, as it always has stayed since I got the car. It may have been doing this longer and I was too comfortable and wasnt looking.

Once I parked, i popped the hood. There wasnt a lot of steam, nothing seemed blown out, but the engine sounded like it was boiling/gurgling, and the expansion tank of coolant was empty. Looked like it had some black sludge in the bottom. Upon further examination after letting it sit for a few days I also noticed my transmission dipstick was bone dry as well.

Today, I changed the thermostat, and filled with coolant to prepare to flush the system. I noticed a grey, milky sludge in the engine that seemed to also be bone dry, instead of green coolant when i took off the thermostat housing. So i poured a gallon in to slosh things around, and was going to drain it when i noticed a puddle of this same grey milk pooling on the street under my transmission. I checked the dipstick, and it was halfway up the stick of the same grey, frothy fluid.

I never noticed any leaks before this so, based on my DIY knowlege of how this car works, I believe the issue is that the coolant and the transmission fluid is mixing in the radiator, which would explain both my overheating issue and my shifting issue. I cant tell exactly where the leak is coming from from the tranny though, its either the send/return line or possible i blew the transmission pan gasket? I'll attach some pics, any confirmation or direction would be hugely appreciated!!! Thanks!
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.



User avatar
volvolugnut
Posts: 84
Joined: Sun Jan 19, 2014 9:51 am
Year and Model: 2001 V70
Location: Midsouth USA
Has thanked: 0
Been thanked: 12 times
United States of America
volvolugnut

Re: 1992 Volvo 940 Non Turbo, Sedan, Overheating, Poor Shifting Issue

Post by volvolugnut » Thu Sep 12, 2019 7:19 pm

This does not sound good for your engine or transmission. The milky liquid is typical of oil and coolant mixture. The transmission cooler could be cross contaminating the coolant if there is a leak in the transmission cooler portion. I would start with a pressure test of the trans cooler by disconnecting both tubes at the radiator and then clamping hoses to the cooler fittings. Plug one of the fittings and apply low pressure air (maybe 10 PSI) to the other fitting. Try to tee a pressure gauge in the air line. Apply the air and see if the cooler will hold pressure. If cooler will not hold pressure you have confirmed the leak.
Then get another radiator - it must be for an auto trans car to have the cooler. Clean and flush both engine coolant and the transmission. I would drop the trans pan and change the filter after you determine where it the trans has leaked. The trans may be toast.


2001 V70 T5, 1986 244DL, 1983 245DL, 1975 245DL, 1959 PV544, multiple parts cars.

Post Reply