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2011 xc60 T6 back at it.

Help, Advice, Owners' Discussion and DIY Tutorials for the groundbreaking new Volvo S60 2011+, V60 2015+ XC60 2010-2018.
Dzikiewicz
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Dzikiewicz

2011 xc60 T6 back at it.

Post by Dzikiewicz » Tue Apr 14, 2020 9:01 pm

Good afternoon everyone

So my Volvo is back at it. (Please see attachment) little back story, I just got over a knarly problem in the car that had to do with the network, and it ended up being the electric power steering pump (thanks again Paul) but now I have this, and as I'm sure you'll notice I am still throwing a network code. Also the P0420 code I've had for months (mainly because I know other P3 guys had problems chasing that problem) so any suggestions on how to proceed? Should I get the air fuel oxygen sensor or perhaps this is another network problem? Any suggestions? Any experience with similar/identical problems.

Always, thank you
Attachments
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Screenshot_20200414-160449.png (277.53 KiB) Viewed 187 times

jimmy57
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Re: 2011 xc60 T6 back at it.

Post by jimmy57 » Tue Apr 14, 2020 9:50 pm

The MAF code and mixture lean codes get fixed first. catalyst efficiency occurs due to a bad cat OR when the exhaust gases going into converter are not what they should be given the oxygen level measured by front oxygen sensor. Let me explain: the oxygen sensor measures oxygen and there is an assumption that the hydrocarbon, carbon monoxide, and other gas counts are proportional to that oxygen level. A bad sensor can report a signal not accurate for the oxygen level due to a fault with sensor, a leak in exhaust may pull in oxygen that would indicate the mixture is in the correct place along the rich lean curve, or individual cylinders are lean or rich and the way the single oxygen sensor is used to monitor average oxygen and then the ECM adjusts fuel delivery to get that average oxygen level in the desired level has some cylinders overly rich or lean causing the true multi gas balance to be off and causes catalyst to not function correctly.
If you have a scan tool that allows you to read the oxygen sensors you can check those sensors. You need to be able to create a vaccum leak. On that engine about the only place to do that is the hose for the EVAP purge valve or to loosen the intake bolts a couple of turns and pull the intake away from head when you want a leak. Get the sensors on your screen, the rear will be voltage and the front will be in lambda. Voltage is high, > .5 V when rich and low, < .5 when lean. Lambda is a representation of actual to desired but it is below 1 when rich and above 1 when lean. For a good sized vacuum leak the rear will go to nearly 0V and the front will go over 1.5, likely almost 3. Warm up engine, let it idle, get values displayed and watch. Front should be .97 to 1.03 and rear should be .64V to .75V. Both will go up and down within those ranges when idling. Now create leak and watch for the two values to go to their lean values within 2 seconds at the same time. Any time the mixture is out of the ideal range the catalyst ceases to work and the rear sensor will mimic the mixture of the front. After it sits idling running lumpy due to the leak for a minute then fix the leak and at the same time watch the values and both should go to a very rich indication, front .8 or lower and the rear .8V or little more, in 2 seconds. If the lean and then rich checks of sensors are as described then those are not the issue. If one of them is definitely slow to change lean and then rich in the test then it is not good. If they pass then look for intake tract leaks, exhaust leaks at head or exhaust connection to turbo. The hose from MAF down to turbo and the vent hose from crankcase breather to intake air hose all need to be checked. If the car has had poorly fitted air filter or has aftermarket oiled media air filter then the MAF could be dirty. Enough things to check for now. Let us know.

Dzikiewicz
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Dzikiewicz

Re: 2011 xc60 T6 back at it.

Post by Dzikiewicz » Sat Apr 18, 2020 10:25 am

Great information man, thank you so much. But interesting enough before the leak test the voltage in sensor 2 was bouncing all over the place. The test went as you said it would things stabilized quick and even the second sensor went where it was suppose to, then started bouncing like crazy. Anyways I'll start looking for leaks.

What do you make of sensor 2? Should I resent my codes for the time being?
Attachments
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jimmy57
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jimmy57

Re: 2011 xc60 T6 back at it.

Post by jimmy57 » Sat Apr 18, 2020 10:38 am

The downstream, #2, sensor is the one checking catalyst. If it more or less mimics the front one then the catalyst is not working. If the front goes below 1, to something like .97 and the rear goes up to .8V and then when the front goes over 1 to something like 1.04 and the rear goes to .1V and it is predictable and consistent then the catalyst is not working. The car should be driven 5 miles to assure catalyst has warmed to working temp before any decisions are made. The rear sensor will be more accurate if you drive so the engine is working but on level ground with steady throttle. Good catalyst function will make the rear signal settle and be pretty stable at .61 to .66V in my experience. When you accelerate the rear will go to high V (.8-.9V) and when you coast it will drop to .1 or 0V.

Dzikiewicz
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Year and Model: 2011 xc60
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Dzikiewicz

Re: 2011 xc60 T6 back at it.

Post by Dzikiewicz » Sat Apr 18, 2020 10:39 am

Actually immediately after I made that previous post, the car rumbled and the second sensor went to 0v and I threw another communication code. So I revved the motor to see what would happen and I got a reading from the second sensor. First image is the revving.
Attachments
Screenshot_20200418-123550.png
Screenshot_20200418-123110.png
Screenshot_20200418-122628.png

Dzikiewicz
Posts: 20
Joined: Tue Oct 15, 2019 11:26 am
Year and Model: 2011 xc60
Location: Ontario
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Dzikiewicz

Re: 2011 xc60 T6 back at it.

Post by Dzikiewicz » Sun Apr 19, 2020 11:24 am

jimmy57 wrote:
Sat Apr 18, 2020 10:38 am
The downstream, #2, sensor is the one checking catalyst. If it more or less mimics the front one then the catalyst is not working. If the front goes below 1, to something like .97 and the rear goes up to .8V and then when the front goes over 1 to something like 1.04 and the rear goes to .1V and it is predictable and consistent then the catalyst is not working. The car should be driven 5 miles to assure catalyst has warmed to working temp before any decisions are made. The rear sensor will be more accurate if you drive so the engine is working but on level ground with steady throttle. Good catalyst function will make the rear signal settle and be pretty stable at .61 to .66V in my experience. When you accelerate the rear will go to high V (.8-.9V) and when you coast it will drop to .1 or 0V.

The sensors the second sensor is at 0v all the time, and the air fuel it at 1.2. I suspect since it just switched to this is a network issue? The cat is not a binary on off kinda thing right? It wouldn't be working then all the sudden not?

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