How to Replace Coolant Expansion Tank on Volvo 850/S70/V70/C70

Let’s talk replacing Coolant Expansion Tank

downtownbun wrote: 
“I need to replace the expansion tank and corresponding hoses (except the top radiator hose) on my 1998 Volvo C70 2.3 ltr coupe. Seems simple right…well here is a little background. I welcome (need) all relevant and polite advice.

I live in a highrise downtown (no shade tree to work under), I am a girl, and I have little experience with car repair (other than paying the bill). I have been taking my car to a shop that has been gouging me on either parts or labor to repair my car. Now that money it tight I am watching every penny. The most recent experience involved the car coolant light coming on. I took it to the shop, they said it was the radiator and it would be $500 in parts. I looked it up online and it was more like $150. I have no problem with the shop marking up the price but 300% is gouging. I mentioned the price I found and they changed their tune to a more reasonable part price, but then charged me $400 in labor (indicating that it was hard to get to my radiator). So after paying $700+ to repair my radiator one would think that the problem was resolved…well it is not. I am having to add water to the radiator everyday to keep it from overheating. I took the car back to the shop and they give me one reason or another as to why the car is still losing coolant…heater core, expansion tank. Again I get the price on the expansion tank and they quote me $150 for something I can buy online for $16 to $40.”

 

 

Expansion tank Volvo 850

Coolant Expansion Tank replacement on 98 C70 coupe

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3 Comments

My 97 850R had a long crack in the tube (that the hose slips over). For a “weekend fix” I removed the hose, cleaned it all up (had been leaking a lot of coolant)(I love Simple Green). then slipped a piece of Heat Shrink Tubing over the ‘nipple”, carefully shrunk it with hair dryer,let it cool, then slipped the hose back on and clamped it. Its been “as new” for two weeks now, and it made a sanitary “fix”. I’ll be keeping my eye out for a nice original, because I’m sure it’ll let go at the worst possible time…Cars know these things…

2000 V70XC AWD. Well, Matt. I purchased the aftermarket version from a good source on the internet and installed it in July of 2010. No problems, except today, on an out of town trip.

Since installing it, I began noticing the smell of coolant inside the cabin. I kept a wary eye on the heater coil, thinking that may be the culprit. After a while, I concluded that the odor was from the engine compartment. Never saw any leaks, though.

Tonight, after topping off the tank earlier, the low level indicator came on. I pulled over before committing myself to the highway and discovered a drip originating on the underside. Made it home, let it cool and just pulled it.

(By the way, WHO THE HELL IS THE VOLVO ROCKET SCIENTIST who came up with the idea of attaching the power steering reservoir to the coolant bottle with a clip tab and two interfering rims? It’s seems to be a one way in design. Not to mention, locating the coolant bottle UP AGAINST THE INSIDE WHEEL WELL WHERE VIBRATION FROM USE WILL CREATE A WEAR-THROUGH ON THE BOTTLE??!!)

Ok, got that off my chest (though, I hope whoever it was, rots away in a Fiat factory). Anyway, my question, since I cannot locate any problem on the bottle or the main coolant line hose that attaches to the bottom, does Volvo use a pipe sealant on the tank nipple, before clamping the hose down? When replacing it last summer, I noticed a tan residue, inside the end of the hose. I also see something similar on the opposite end of the hose, where it attaches to the metal ‘T’.

Thanks,

leadmann

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