Volvo Fuel Octane Discussion

That’s $36 for the cheapest stuff they have or $39 for the best available … that’s less than 10% difference and the car drives better, idles better and gives me that tiny little bit of peace of mind that I’m doing the best I can to keep my Volvo’s engine healthy…

volvo fuel octane

Lets talk about volvo fuel octane.

In demanding driving conditions, such as operating the vehicle in hot weather, towing a trailer, or driving for extended periods at higher altitudes than normal, it may be advisable to switch to higher octane fuel (91 or higher) or to change gasoline brands to fully utilize your engine’s capacity, and for the smoothest possible operation.

Do not use gasoline that contains lead as a knock inhibitor, and do not use lead additives. Besides damaging the exhaust emission control systems on your vehicle, lead has been strongly linked to certain forms of cancer.

Many fuels contain benzene as a solvent. Unburned benzene has been strongly linked to certain forms of cancer. If you live in an area where you must fill your own gas tank, take precautions.

MVS Forum Member parksah07 asks:

currently i see a ton of different octane ratings and a ton of different oppinions on it, some people say it doesnt help performance at all, some say it does,

im just wondering whats the difference between 87 octane to the 94 stuff, performance? better on engine? better for fuel filter?

besides the price difference heh

thanks again guys

MVS Forum Member parksah07 replied:

thank you, volvos ‘anti knock’ rating is 91 isnt it?? (91 octane)

MVS Forum Member petershen1984 added:

If this is accurate as a rule of thumb, cars with compression ratios of over 10:1, or if the engine is turbocharged, then the premium grade is required, because this “compression” is what causes lower-graded fuel to ignite before actual spark.

Knocking/pre-ignition wastes power because, while the piston is being pushed up naturally in the cylinder, the preignition pushes the cylinder down before it reaches the top. Consequently, the piston is forced to “knock” on the sides of the cylinder walls, which makes the sound we hear typically when the engine is under a workload (climbing hills, with more passengers).

Fuel Octane Discussion

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