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DIY: 1998 S70 GLT AC Pulley Bearing (also Alternator and PS Pump) procedure

Help, Advice and DIY Tutorials on Volvo's extremely popular car line -- Volvo's 1990s "bread and butter" cars -- powered by the ubiquitous and durable Volvo inline 5-cylinder engine.

1992 - 1997 850, 850 R, 850 T5-R, 850 T5, 850 GLT
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cn90
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Volvo Repair Database DIY: 1998 S70 GLT AC Pulley Bearing (also Alternator and PS Pump) procedure

Post by cn90 » Mon Jun 05, 2017 9:26 pm

DIY: 1998 S70 GLT AC Pulley Bearing (also Alternator and PS Pump) procedure

OK,

My 1998 S70 GLT AC Pulley Bearing with 185K miles has been making some faint noise for the last 2 years, I know the AC pulley has been free-wheeling for 2 years. People in the forum say the Zexel compressor should last > 225K miles, this is why I replaced only the pulley bearing and not the whole compressor.

I did 2 stupid things this weekend: doing a write-up for a 20-year-old-car-with-185K-miles (just kidding) and should have done it differently but it is what it is.

In retrospect, the AC Pulley bearing would be “a bit” easier if I d/c the oil cooler line and tilt the compressor upward to allow me to use puller etc.

- The M5 bolt was tightened slowly, but all it did was bending the metal tab on the clutch and the clutch itself did NOT budge. The reason I did it this way (w/o template) is that: a few people in forum said they did not use the template, they simply tighten the M5 bolts and clutch came out. It was not true in my case, the clutch was on so tight that I had to use screwdriver. Maybe I should have used the custom template (holes drilled at radius of 19 mm) as written by “Nathan Bryant” a while back:

https://www.matthewsvolvosite.com/downl ... AC-Fix.pdf

- The custom template (see the pdf above) with holes drilled with radius of 19mm is probably the way to go. Use an old brake pad as mentioned etc. If you don’t want to bend the clutch, then read the pdf above!

- Initially I did not want to d/c the upper radiator hose, but eventually I had to. It made life so much easier. Just remember to reconnect the rad hose and add coolant later.

- NA model: easier b/c you don’t have the Oil Cooler hose in the way and you should be able to tilt the AC compressor upward to allow the use of puller.
See the posts by burnout8488:
viewtopic.php?f=1&t=60561

- Anyway, if you want to do my stupid way, read on. Hey, BTW, this DIY is also good for PS Pump and Alternator as it is basically the same procedure.

TOOLS/PARTS:
- 12-mm, 13-mm, and 14-mm sockets, offset wrench, straight wrench etc.
- Universal joint (3/8” type)
- Long 3/8” extension
- Iron Pipe as added leverage for ratchet
- Tire Pry Bar ($6 at Harbor Freight)
- Serp Belt tool (I use my own tool, made from plumbing 1-inch metal plug, info in forum).
- M5 bolts (hardware store)
- AC Pulley Bearing for most Volvo 850 and 1998 S70 is 35x55x20mm type. I bought the bearing for ebay for $20: Nachi 35BG05S16G-2DL, made in Japan.
- Circlip removal tool (a few dollars)

Volvo-S70-ACcomp-01.jpg
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PROCEDURE:

1. D/C the battery ground cable. Make sure you have the code for the Radio.


2. D/C rad hose, remember to add coolant when all done.

Volvo-S70-ACcomp-02.jpg
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3. Turn tensioner Clockwise to undo the serp belt. The tensioner is held by two 12-mm bolts. I guess you can leave it attached to the BIG bracket.

Volvo-S70-ACcomp-03.jpg
Volvo-S70-ACcomp-03.jpg (211.66 KiB) Viewed 3509 times


4. Now, spend some time to study the setup: it is very convoluted engineering…this bracket, that bracket, this bolt, that bolt. But if you spend a little studying this thingy, it is NOT difficult. If you understand the alternator setup, then you are golden. See photos added in the next post below.

- Bolt #1 is the front one.
- Bolt #2 is hidden (access from belt side) and it goes to the welded nut on the triangular bracket.
- Bolt #3 will make you swear! Access from the engine side is so tight, you need universal joint + very long extension + ratchet + pipe etc. The bolt goes to the BIG bracket welded nut!
- The big red cable is held by a 13-mm nut and the rectangular connector is spade-type.

Volvo-S70-ACcomp-05.jpg
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Volvo-S70-ACcomp-06.jpg
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5. AC compressor is mounted by four (4) 14-mm bolts. Use universal joint + extension + pipe.

Volvo-S70-ACcomp-07.jpg
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6. The AC tool is no good as I did not have enough space (compressor not tilted upward), so I used M5 bolts + screwdriver as counterhold, the center bolt is 10-mm type.

Volvo-S70-ACcomp-08.jpg
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Volvo-S70-ACcomp-09.jpg
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7. Circlip has a beveled edge, which faces outward!

Volvo-S70-ACcomp-10.jpg
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Volvo-S70-ACcomp-11.jpg
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8. The M5 bolts, when not using with custom plate (drilled holes with radius of 19mm) will bend the metal tab on the clutch. I used a screwdriver to slowly pry it out, but this is not recommended. The tire pry bar is used to pry the pulley out:

Volvo-S70-ACcomp-12.jpg
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Volvo-S70-ACcomp-13.jpg
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9. To remove the old bearing, you can grind the dimples off, I did NOT. I simply tap it out using the 36-mm axle socket. Make sure you place the pulley on a piece of wood when hammering the old pulley.

Volvo-S70-ACcomp-14.jpg
Volvo-S70-ACcomp-14.jpg (290.62 KiB) Viewed 3509 times


10. To install new bearing, apply some grease to ease the process, use old bearing to tap it in. When all done, I used cold chisel to re-create the dimples.

Volvo-S70-ACcomp-15.jpg
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11. I used wood + tire pry bar to push the new pulley in. Make sure you oil the inner race a bit to make it easier.

Volvo-S70-ACcomp-16.jpg
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12. Install the circlip, I used a mirror to make sure the circlip sits correctly in the groove (the beveled edge faces outward):

Volvo-S70-ACcomp-17.jpg
Volvo-S70-ACcomp-17.jpg (171.74 KiB) Viewed 3509 times


* Now the stupid part…during removal of the clutch using screwdriver, the metal tabs are bent a bit by the M5 bolts pushing it outward. Miraculously, I managed to fix it.
Also remove the thicker shim and got the gap down to 0.3mm or so. All is good now, somewhat quieter.

* The alternator was replaced by the P.O. at 120K miles (Rebuilt Bosch AL0752X type) and has about 65K on it, when I spin it, it free-wheels for about 2 full revolutions, and I can hear some bearing noise (not sure normal or not), I don’t know what this means, but it seems fine for now. If I ever need to replace the alternator, it will be easy b/c I know my way now!!!

That is all folks, if you want to have an easy life, don’t do this job. But if you are a Volvo enthusiast and are crazy like me, then:

1- Make the custom template to remove the clutch and hopefully it comes out without bending the metal tabs! Removing the Clutch is the single worst step you ever do, it is on tight and you can damage the clutch like I did. Luckily I fixed mine.

2- If you have Turbo engine, consider undoing the oil cooler line to allow you to tilt the AC compressor upward.

That is all boys and girls…
Last edited by cn90 on Tue Jun 06, 2017 9:14 pm, edited 3 times in total.
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Re: DIY: 1998 S70 GLT AC Pulley Bearing (also Alternator and PS Pump) procedure

Post by Ozark Lee » Tue Jun 06, 2017 5:58 pm

Really well done. I will have Matt put it in the repair database.

...Lee
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Re: DIY: 1998 S70 GLT AC Pulley Bearing (also Alternator and PS Pump) procedure

Post by cn90 » Tue Jun 06, 2017 6:33 pm

I want to add a few photos to clarify this convoluted setup. This topic (PS Pump, Alternator, and AC compressor setup) is very confusing with conflicting info in different forums.

So I am posting these photos for those who need to replace the alternator and/or PS Pump.


This photo shows the belt routing for 1993-1998 vs 1999 ---> later models.
- In the 1993-1998, the mechanical tensioner is held by 2 bolts.
- In the 1999 ---> later models, the mechanical tensioner is moved downward, the idler pulley eliminated, the belt has double-sided ribs, so the other side of the belt can loop on alternator pulley.
- The BLUE arrow shows the bolt that goes to the welded nut on the TRIANGULAR Bracket.
- In the 1999 ---> later models, since the idler pulley is eliminated, you can see the welded nut for Alternator bolt #3.

Volvo-S70-ACcomp-18.jpg
Volvo-S70-ACcomp-18.jpg (198.76 KiB) Viewed 3415 times


The PS Pump:
* Belt side ---> 3 bolts (just rotate the pulley to access the bolts)
* Engine side ---> 2 bolts

Volvo-S70-ACcomp-19.jpg
Volvo-S70-ACcomp-19.jpg (153.46 KiB) Viewed 3415 times
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Re: DIY: 1998 S70 GLT AC Pulley Bearing (also Alternator and PS Pump) procedure

Post by abscate » Wed Jun 07, 2017 4:49 pm

Score another one for the bastards....
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Re: DIY: 1998 S70 GLT AC Pulley Bearing (also Alternator and PS Pump) procedure

Post by oragex » Wed Jun 07, 2017 7:35 pm

Any reasons why you didn't toss the compressor? This makes the job easier and especially helps removing the clutch without a pry bar which will almost surely bend and require the clutch plate to be replaced.

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Re: DIY: 1998 S70 GLT AC Pulley Bearing (also Alternator and PS Pump) procedure

Post by cn90 » Wed Jun 07, 2017 7:47 pm

Hi oragex,

- As I mentioned above, the new compressor is much easier but mine was working fine, cooling the cabin without issues. Plus, people in forum tell me this Zexel compressor easily goes to 225K or so. My only problem is the pulley BEARING, which I replaced.

- From reading other forums, people simply thread the M5 bolts in evenly (no need for the homemade metal plate as in the video you posted above), and the clutch simply came out. It was NOT the case for me, the clutch stayed and the M5 bolts bent the metal tabs built into the clutch.

- The way I fixed the bent tabs: got some round plumbing adapter, placed the clutch flat part on the round adapter, place a piece of wood and gently hammer it back. Interestingly, it went back to factory condition. I checked it by installing it in the compressor and rotate it, it was still nice and round/even. So it worked out for me (I thought I had to buy a new clutch).

- The video you posted above: one has to make the tool, which is no big deal...just drill a few holes on an old brake pad or metal plate etc. The problem is: even with this tool, I think I will still bend the clutch metal tabs, simply b/c the clutch was not tight. This is the Zexel design to be tight for nothing. The Denso compressor (in my BMW and Honda): once the 10-mm bolts comes, you simply pull the clutch out by hand.
Last edited by cn90 on Wed Jun 07, 2017 10:13 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: DIY: 1998 S70 GLT AC Pulley Bearing (also Alternator and PS Pump) procedure

Post by wizechatmgr » Wed Jun 07, 2017 9:02 pm

*Bookmarks this*
Very cool write up that is going to save a lot of people a lot of money.
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Re: DIY: 1998 S70 GLT AC Pulley Bearing (also Alternator and PS Pump) procedure

Post by abscate » Thu Jun 08, 2017 1:28 am

Kudos for getting this done on the car. I think I would have yanked the compressor to do this since I learned the tricks of that earlier and have a right angle air socket gun from HF to deal with those mounts....zip,zip zip
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Re: DIY: 1998 S70 GLT AC Pulley Bearing (also Alternator and PS Pump) procedure

Post by cn90 » Sat Jun 10, 2017 10:07 am

I also own a 2005 XC90 2.5T and there is more space to remove the AC Clutch in the SUV.
If I ever have to reshim or replace the pulley bearing in the XC90, there is more space, so none of this removing PS Pump, Alternator, Loosing AC compressor bolts (such as in the Volvo 850, S70, V70).

I just watched some youtube video on how to remove the Zexel AC Clutch as it can be tight.
If you don't want to make your own tool (drilling 3 holes in an old brake pad etc.), then ebay has a whole bunch of sellers selling the nice little AC Clutch removal tool for $19-$20. I just bought this AC Clutch removal kit for future use.

ACTool.jpg
ACTool.jpg (181.98 KiB) Viewed 2550 times


This is the VIDEO to show you how the AC Tool works:



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Re: DIY: 1998 S70 GLT AC Pulley Bearing (also Alternator and PS Pump) procedure

Post by JimBee » Sun Aug 27, 2017 10:59 am

Having refurbed 2 850 systems this summer, I will suggest removing the compressor to get at the clutch. One thing cn90 confirms is that the pulley is very robust, made of hard steel and will withstand some serious prying.

With my compressor on the bench, using 3 5mm bolts actually did work, but there was a problem. Those 5mm bolts bottom out on the bearing seal, distorting it so grease can leak out, which is why I replaced my bearing. If you're doing the job to replace the bearing anyway, that's not a problem. If you're doing to remove a clutch shim, you risk ruining the bearing. I took my pulley to the corner auto repair indie and one of the guys pounded it out using the mandrel and a disc (also available for rental from O'Reilly) with the bearing supported over a 5 inch bench vice. It came hard all the way. He was a strong guy and really had to wail on it, likewise installing the new one. There's no need to redo the dimples on the pulley casting to secure the new bearing.

I also discovered that to "crack" the pulley bearing loose from the compressor's nose casting, takes quite a bit of pulling force. I used a 3-claw puller (rented from O'Reilly).

Also the circlip groove (on the nose casting) on both of mine had some crud built up that prevented reseating the clip. This is hard to clean even with the compressor on the bench. The corner shop had a right size replacement clip which was helpful b/c the original one was slightly distorted when I removed it. I also discovered that proper alignment of the pulley after removing a clutch shim and driving the pulley with new bearing back onto the nose casting, and replacing the circlip, required one last use of the 3-claw puller to reset the pulley firmly against the circlip. Probably impossible to do with the compressor installed.

BTW: After ruining the bearing seal on my first attempt to use the 5mm bolts to walk the clutch off, I discovered that a local Autozone store had the complete A/C kit for rental. It has the slotted disc tool like the one shown in the Amazon pic above. It's the perfect tool (which I describe in my MVS writeup) but you can only use it with compressor removed (or at least unbolted and moved toward the drivers side a bit or tilted up, if possible) because the large center bolt needed to pull the clutch is too long for the installed compressor. On the bench it worked perfectly.

It's more work to remove the compressor b/c you need to pump out the system first and then use a 6 mm HEX tool to remove the hose flanges, but you can work on it far easier, change the oil (the Zexels have a drain plug), clean up your o-ring grooves, replace o-rings, etc. (Oil specs are discussed in recent MVS "Volvo 850 a/c" posts) Time-wise and in terms of frustration and the possibility of bending the clutch webs, I'd still recommend pulling the compressor to do the job. Using the proper pulling tools it's all quite easy—and after removing a shim and reinstalling everything, if you discover you removed the wrong shim or otherwise need to adjust something, it's still right there on your bench where you can easily measure the reset clutch gap. Need to pull the clutch again to further adjust it? No problem; use the Autozone kit and it's off with no damage to anything in 5 minutes.

Final note: I also replaced my dryers which, if the originals are rusty they might leak before the compressor fails. They're available for ~ $25.00. If you do that, use plenty of PB Blaster in the springlock connector then use a cutoff wheel to cut the dryer's gooseneck near the top of the dryer body (away from the springlock connector to avoid getting metal particles into the system). Then, using the plastic release tool, you can rotate and pull off the cut gooseneck quite easily. I found that the threads of the large coupling nut on the dryer hose were kind of rusted to the dryer threads and there's no room to get a large enough wrench in there to get it apart. No problem. Just disconnect the other end of that hose and take the assembly to your work bench. There I used a pipe wrench and a large adjustable wrench to hold it. It took some force to crack that nut. I used a little lube on the threads reconnecting the new dryer. There's an o-ring in that coupling, too, also included with my new dryers along with o-rings for the gooseneck. Replace those with a little PAG oil and everything goes together quite easliy.

If you have hoses open it's a good idea to cover their ends with a baggie and twist tie (piece of tape over an open port on the condenser), even though you're going to pump the system down with Autozone's rental compressor and gauges. The recent MVS Volvo 850 a/c posts have more details.
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