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2006 XC70 Evap pump replacement process

Help, Advice, Owners' Discussion and DIY Tutorials on Volvo's stylish, distinctive P2 platform cars sold as model years 2001-2007 (North American market year designations).

2001 - 2007 V70
2001 - 2004 V70 XC (Cross Country)
2004 - 2007 XC70 (Cross Country)
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2003 - 2007 S60 R
2004 - 2007 V70 R

This topic is in the MVS Volvo Repair Database » 2006 XC70 Evap pump replacement process
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scot850
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Volvo Repair Database 2006 XC70 Evap pump replacement process

Post by scot850 »

2006 Volvo XC70 – Replacing the Evap. detection pump.

As promised, here is my brief write up on how I replaced the evap. Pump on our car. The process is not especially difficult, and not many special tools are required.

Tools:
- Metric socket set and ratchet
- Drill and 5mm drill bit to drill out x 3 pop-rivets
- Pop rivet gun and suitable rivets (I used ……..
- 2 x oetiker clamp rings (Volvo part #: 978176).
- Ideally a right angle oetiker clamp tool. Otherwise 2 x screw clamps may work instead.
- -1 x Vacuum/emissions pump (Volvo part #: 31392490) – Note below, Volvo appear to have made this a generic pump, so although the pump portion is the same, it comes with 2 plastic pipes that have to be removed prior to use – see pictures)

I have access to the Volvo repair information, and used the information on there, but found there are a few areas where I deviated from the suggested process as I felt it was easier or quicker.

Process:
1) Firstly I jacked the car up (using a rubber pad on my garage trolley jack) lifting the car slowly with the pad under the rear ‘A’ arms to allow the axle stands to be positioned under the jacking pads just forward of the rear wheels. As I didn’t know how much room may be needed later, this gave more room to work under the car.
2) Remove the LH rear wheel.
3) Crawl under the car and remove one of the 2 bolts holding the cross bracket near the middle of the car which bridges under the prop-shaft. I loosened the other bolt and just swung the bracket around so it was not in the way.
Bracket under prop-shaft and muffler
Bracket under prop-shaft and muffler
4) This next part is where I deviated from the plan slightly. Following discussion with the Volvo Service foreman, he advised, they do not remove the muffler system from the cat back as with careful handling it can lowered sufficiently to give the required access at the rear of the vehicle.
5) The pump is fitted above a guard plate/heat shield above the rear-most muffler box. To remove the plate, the muffler has to be lowered sufficiently to remove the mounting nuts for the plate and pull it out.
6) Be careful removing the 3 rubber hangers for the muffler system. The ones fitted to our car were still in good condition, but be prepared to maybe needing to replace some or all depending on where you live and age of your car. I used a little silicon spray to ‘lube’ the mounting pins to allow the rubbers to slide off. I did the 2 just rear of the rear axle first, leaving the last one to the rear of the muffler box to last. I had a spare axle stand ready to support the muffler system once it was lowered enough. NOTE: Again, depending where you live and vehicle age, your muffler system could be fragile!! Our muffler looked good until I lowered it and discovered the 2 halves of the outer clamshell cover for rear muffler had almost separated due to stupid mild-steel crimp strip used to hold the 2 parts together had rotted away. I decided to replace the muffler as we were going on a 2000km trip, but a Volvo mechanic said they often remove the outer casing and run the vehicle until the inner portion fails. In this area it can sometimes take up to 2 years! NOTE 2: This is also where I discovered, the original muffler system was a one piece from the cat back. The new system is a 2 part. From the cat (including the front muffler) to just before the rear muffler, and the rear muffler and tail pipe. You have to carefully cut the pipe just prior to the rear muffler and then the new muffler has an integral clamp which slides over the old pipe and clamps them together. I planned to do this myself, but access is tricky on your back, and as the front bolts were badly rusted at the cat, I decided to pay the dealer 1 hour labor (and thus get a 2 year warranty on part and labor) to do the job for me. This did not prevent the rest of the job being done however!
2 rubber muffler mounts rear of rear axle
2 rubber muffler mounts rear of rear axle
Rear muffler box mount looking up from underneath rear of car
Rear muffler box mount looking up from underneath rear of car

7) With the muffler system carefully supported on the jack stand, the next job was to remove the heat shield above the muffler. This is held on with 2 x 10mm plastic nuts, and also the 3 pop rivets. 2 of the rivets are hidden behind the plastic liner (see picture). I removed the 10mm plastic nut nearest to the rivets, which allowed enough room (with some bending ) of the arch liner to get my drill in to drill out the 2 rivets.
LH rear wheel removed and 10mm nut removed
LH rear wheel removed and 10mm nut removed
Bend the arch liner back and 2 rivets to remove are here
Bend the arch liner back and 2 rivets to remove are here

8) Next, I decided to remove the rearmost bracket that supports the rear muffler. The heat shield is attached to this using the 3rd pop-rivet, but it is difficult to get to and Volvo decided to rivet it from the top down. This meant removing the bracket anyway, so I left it attached to the bracket and just removed the 2 bracket bolts instead. Finally removed the 2 plastic nuts holding the heat shield and carefully (read, wrestled!!) the heat shield out.
Remove the 2 bolts holding rear muffler mount bracket
Remove the 2 bolts holding rear muffler mount bracket
One of 2 plastic heat shield nuts to remove
One of 2 plastic heat shield nuts to remove

9) This now gave access to the Evap. Pump (although not much room!!).
1 of 3 views of pump. Positioned in-front of spare wheel well and above rear axle
1 of 3 views of pump. Positioned in-front of spare wheel well and above rear axle
2 of 3 views of Evap pump
2 of 3 views of Evap pump
3 of 3 views of Evap pump
3 of 3 views of Evap pump
10) I used a flat blade screw driver to pop the lowest oetiker clamp, and then removed the 2 bracket bolts ( can’t remember if 8 or 9mm socket)for the Evap. pump which gave room to allow it to drop sufficiently to access the upper pie and remove the 2nd oetiker clamp. With a little WD40 and gentle persuasion, the 2 vacuum pipes were removed allowing the pump to be removed.
Remove the wiring connector. Maybe there is an easy way to disconnect this, but I ended up using a small hook tool to carefully lift one side of the connector where there is a raised 'bump' before being able to disconnect it. Be careful as the plastic will be fragile by now!
11) I checked the new pump against the old one and discovered, I had 2 remove the 2 plastic pipe fitted to the new pump. I carefully used an Exacto-knife to take slices off the plastic pipe so as to not damage the pump outlets. “You have to remove the mounting plate from the old pump and transfer to the new one. You need to un-screw the 3 Torx screw holding it in place to the pump. I cleaned these up first and carefully removed. Leave the bracket off, as it is much easier to refit the new pump to the old vacuum pipes under the car without it fitted.
Old and new pumps. New pump with pipes
Old and new pumps. New pump with pipes
Old and new pumps, with new pump pipes removed
Old and new pumps, with new pump pipes removed
12) Replacement is the reversal, but with a couple of notes. I ended up using a lot of engineering terms trying to get the new pump back in, more mainly due to access to the new oetiker claps with the tools I have. I right-angle oetiker clamp tool would be ideal. I just had to fiddle about to get enough room to get my straight on tool into work. This almost took longer than the rest of the job!!
13) Re-fit the pump bracket using the 3 Torx screws, and replace the 2 bracket bolts.
14) Finally refit the heat shield, remount and tighten the rear muffler mount, and finally replace the 2 pop-rivets under the rear of the LH arch liner.
15) The rest is just the reversal from there on, not forgetting to replace the plastic nut on the rear arch liner!
16) I had to then re-set the fault code for the ‘minor evap system leak’ with my code reader.
17) All has been good since then!
18) Finally, I learned the hard way, but as JRL pointed out, the Evap. Pump is the usual suspect in this problem. I was told the pump gives a ‘Major Evap. Leak’ code, but was not the case for my car. I had already replaced the Evap. Valve and the gas cap. The cost of the parts, and time it took me to replace was not much, but I replaced parts that were probably ok. It is a coin toss on if it was worthwhile spending an hour of dealer time to have identified the problem source first. I ended up paying for this anyway, as I may have needed the system ‘fogged’ if the pump had been ok to find the leak. I have now replaced all the major parts anyway.

Hope this guide is of help to others out there!

Neil.
2000 V70 R - still being an endless PITA
2006 XC70
2003 Toyota 4Runner V8 Limited
2015 Kia Sportage EX-L - Sold
1993 850 GLT -Sold
1998 V70 XC - Sold
1997 Volvo 850 SE NA - Went to niece in California - Sold
2000 V70 SE NA - Sold

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NC2001v70
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Year and Model: 2001 V70 2.4l. non t
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Post by NC2001v70 »

This is a very well documented repair and I would nominate this for a link in the major repairs if I had any pull on this forum. This is almost complete, except to include the j hose,evap valve, & evap canister which are attached to the other end of the hoses you have pictured there. I must admit however I did only my j hose replacement for my repair (small leak detected), used screw type clamps for the hose (which made it a lot easier) and I used a couple of heavy duty plastic wire ties to replace the rivets in the exhaust shield as I was sure I would be back in there for more repairs soon enough with 160k miles and counting.

fazool
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Post by fazool »

Hey all - I just wanted to post a thanks and kudos on this write-up.

I just finished this job on my daughters 2009 S60 AWD and it's basically the exact same procedure (I did the rain squeal bracket while I had the exhaust lowered).

Just a great explanation and writeup and worked perfectly.

2007 S60 2.5T AWD (Daily Driver)
2001 S60 2.4T (Daughter's Car)
2003 S80 2.9 (Son's Car)
1995 850 2.4 (Daughter's Car - sold off)
2005 S40 2.4i (Bought new - since sold)
1986 740GLE 2.3(First Volvo - sold off)

Georgeandkira
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Post by Georgeandkira »

Add me to the "Thank You" list.

A) Are there "thin Ideal clamps" available to eliminate the need for Oetiker clamps? What diameter were they?

B) Why didn't you use the new hosing which came with the new pump? Was the new hosing the same "jelly rubber" the "J" hose is made of?

scot850
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Post by scot850 »

No the hoses were formed hard plastic and would not work in this application.

At the time I did not have Oetiker clamping tools that could clamp in both orientations. Now I do this would be a lot simpler. As to the clamp sizes, I can no longer remember the sizes. You could use the worm drive style clamps, but I find these days were I live all you get is the cheap crap, not the nice rounded edge ABA style in stainless.

Apologies for the late response but I'm not in the P2 section too often.

Neil.
2000 V70 R - still being an endless PITA
2006 XC70
2003 Toyota 4Runner V8 Limited
2015 Kia Sportage EX-L - Sold
1993 850 GLT -Sold
1998 V70 XC - Sold
1997 Volvo 850 SE NA - Went to niece in California - Sold
2000 V70 SE NA - Sold

jfed
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Joined: 19 Oct 2018, 09:51
Year and Model: 2013 XC70
Location: NY

Post by jfed »

Anyone know if this would be the same for a 2013 XC70

Thank you
Josh

timetobakethedonuts
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Post by timetobakethedonuts »

This is a good writeup, but unfortunately the V70 (not XC) is quite a bit different. I have an '05 2.5T. Up through removing the top exhaust shield with the three rivets and two nuts is identical. But the three torx screws that mount the pump are not visible or accessible. There appears to be a long bracket that the canister and pump mount to, but the pump mounts on a plate that sits about 1/4" above the long bracket. Best I have been able to determine, a 10mm bolt that goes in from above, and into a captive nut welded to the long plate, holds the pump mounting plate. But that 10mm bolt is not coming out easily because the threads are exposed below the nut and are corroded - I am using a 6-pt socket. I can not yet tell if this will result in the pump being able to be removed. Someone posted the maintenance manual procedure, and it describes "pulling the pump out" which seems to imply there is a rubber piece a tang on the pump mounting plate slide fit into. But I am using a mirror (extremely hard to see), it is looks like just the mounting plate held by one bolt. This has been very aggravating and it looks like I am going to have to go to the stealer.

br0dy519
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Post by br0dy519 »

Could you cut an access hole from above using a dremel? I saw that in a j-hose replacement thread one time and thought it was a brilliant idea.
04s60 2.4
04xc70 2.5t
prwood wrote:I wish I had a permanent car repair area that was covered, had a level surface, lighting and fans, a workbench, and tool cabinets. You know,like a garage. Much of my time during the job is spent hauling things up and down the stairs to the basement or in and out of the storage shed, or running back downstairs when I realize I need something else,or taking a break from standing out in the sun,or using flashlights or work lamps when it gets dark.

timetobakethedonuts
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Post by timetobakethedonuts »

br0dy519 wrote: 20 Aug 2022, 22:28 Could you cut an access hole from above using a dremel? I saw that in a j-hose replacement thread one time and thought it was a brilliant idea.
I assume you are responding to my comment on this old thread. The same thought occurred to me, or the fantasy of access from above. I have additional information. I searched on Ebay and sure enough the entire used assembly is being sold by a few sellers. It turns out that the 10mm bolt I referred to only holds the canister to the long plate. The plate the pump attaches to sits 1/4" above that, and it steps down and is welded to the long plate. So the only way I can see to remove the pump is to slide the entire assembly fore or aft of the subframe. There are two bolts in the ends of the long plate from beneath that are accessible - the only question is, how many things need to be disconnected, and how far the assembly will slide.

Attached is a picture of the assembly removed from a P2 V70 - showing the "double plate" area where the pump mounts. The standoffs are broken off in this picture. You can see the rusted 10mm hold down bolt for the canister also. The canister and pump sit directly above the subframe. Note the large mounting hole in the end of the plate.

The area in question is extremely hard to see - I have only a 3/4" inspection mirror (note to self - buy a rectangular loose mirror like the one misplaced years ago), and while I could see the 10mm bolt, what it fastens was not readily apparent.

Incidentally, I also discovered that the VADIS PDF sheets someone else posted, which refer to "pull the pump out", are in fact a design where a u-shaped mounting plate is used, and it has two ears that slide into a rubber mount. Sadly, this is not applicable to my car. I find it interesting that I haven't been able to find any other people posting about this weird setup. Perhaps if I have success I will post a few pictures.
Attachments
evap.jpg
evap.jpg (50.01 KiB) Viewed 191 times

scot850
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Post by scot850 »

Thanks for the update and clarification!

Neil.
2000 V70 R - still being an endless PITA
2006 XC70
2003 Toyota 4Runner V8 Limited
2015 Kia Sportage EX-L - Sold
1993 850 GLT -Sold
1998 V70 XC - Sold
1997 Volvo 850 SE NA - Went to niece in California - Sold
2000 V70 SE NA - Sold

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