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2006 XC70 Evap pump replacement process

re, but found there are a few areas where I deviated from the suggested process as I felt it was easier or quicker.

scot850 » 2006 Volvo XC70 – Replacing the Evap. detection pump.

As promised, here is my brief write up on how I replaced the evap. pump on our car. The process is not especially difficult, and not many special tools are required.

Tools

  • Metric socket set and ratchet
  • Drill and 5mm drill bit to drill out x 3 pop-rivets
  • Pop rivet gun and suitable rivets (I used ……..
  • 2 x Oetiker clamp rings (Volvo part #: 978176).
  • Ideally a right angle oetiker clamp tool. Otherwise 2 x screw clamps may work instead.
  • 1 x Vacuum/emissions pump (Volvo part #: 31392490) – Note below, Volvo appear to have made this a generic pump, so although the pump portion is the same, it comes with 2 plastic pipes that have to be removed prior to use – see pictures)

I have access to the Volvo repair information, and used the information on there, but found there are a few areas where I deviated from the suggested process as I felt it was easier or quicker.

Process

1) Firstly I jacked the car up (using a rubber pad on my garage trolley jack) lifting the car slowly with the pad under the rear ‘A’ arms to allow the axle stands to be positioned under the jacking pads just forward of the rear wheels. As I didn’t know how much room may be needed later, this gave more room to work under the car.

2) Remove the LH rear wheel.

3) Crawl under the car and remove one of the 2 bolts holding the cross bracket near the middle of the car which bridges under the prop-shaft. I loosened the other bolt and just swung the bracket around so it was not in the way.

Bracket under prop-shaft and muffler
Bracket under prop-shaft and muffler

4) This next part is where I deviated from the plan slightly. Following discussion with the Volvo Service foreman, he advised, they do not remove the muffler system from the cat back as with careful handling it can lowered sufficiently to give the required access at the rear of the vehicle.

5) The pump is fitted above a guard plate/heat shield above the rear-most muffler box. To remove the plate, the muffler has to be lowered sufficiently to remove the mounting nuts for the plate and pull it out.

6) Be careful removing the 3 rubber hangers for the muffler system. The ones fitted to our car were still in good condition, but be prepared to maybe needing to replace some or all depending on where you live and age of your car. I used a little silicon spray to ‘lube’ the mounting pins to allow the rubbers to slide off. I did the 2 just rear of the rear axle first, leaving the last one to the rear of the muffler box to last. I had a spare axle stand ready to support the muffler system once it was lowered enough.

NOTE: Again, depending where you live and vehicle age, your muffler system could be fragile!! Our muffler looked good until I lowered it and discovered the 2 halves of the outer clamshell cover for rear muffler had almost separated due to stupid mild-steel crimp strip used to hold the 2 parts together had rotted away. I decided to replace the muffler as we were going on a 2000km trip, but a Volvo mechanic said they often remove the outer casing and run the vehicle until the inner portion fails. In this area it can sometimes take up to 2 years!

NOTE 2: This is also where I discovered, the original muffler system was a one piece from the cat back. The new system is a 2 part. From the cat (including the front muffler) to just before the rear muffler, and the rear muffler and tail pipe. You have to carefully cut the pipe just prior to the rear muffler and then the new muffler has an integral clamp which slides over the old pipe and clamps them together. I planned to do this myself, but access is tricky on your back, and as the front bolts were badly rusted at the cat, I decided to pay the dealer 1 hour labor (and thus get a 2 year warranty on part and labor) to do the job for me. This did not prevent the rest of the job being done however!

2 rubber muffler mounts rear of rear axle
2 rubber muffler mounts rear of rear axle

Rear muffler box mount looking up from underneath rear of car
Rear muffler box mount looking up from underneath rear of car

7) With the muffler system carefully supported on the jack stand, the next job was to remove the heat shield above the muffler. This is held on with 2 x 10mm plastic nuts, and also the 3 pop rivets. 2 of the rivets are hidden behind the plastic liner (see picture). I removed the 10mm plastic nut nearest to the rivets, which allowed enough room (with some bending ) of the arch liner to get my drill in to drill out the 2 rivets.

LH rear wheel removed and 10mm nut removed
LH rear wheel removed and 10mm nut removed

Bend the arch liner back and 2 rivets to remove are here
Bend the arch liner back and 2 rivets to remove are here

 Next, I decided to remove the rearmost bracket that supports the rear muffler. The heat shield is attached to this using the 3rd pop-rivet, but it is difficult to get to and Volvo decided to rivet it from the top down. This meant removing the bracket anyway, so I left it attached to the bracket and just removed the 2 bracket bolts instead. Finally removed the 2 plastic nuts holding the heat shield and carefully (read, wrestled!!) the heat shield out.

Remove the 2 bolts holding rear muffler mount bracket
Remove the 2 bolts holding rear muffler mount bracket

One of 2 plastic heat shield nuts to remove
One of 2 plastic heat shield nuts to remove

9) This now gave access to the Evap. Pump (although not much room!!).

1 of 3 views of pump. Positioned in-front of spare wheel well and above rear axle
1 of 3 views of pump. Positioned in-front of spare wheel well and above rear axle

2 of 3 views of Evap pump
2 of 3 views of Evap pump

3 of 3 views of Evap pump
3 of 3 views of Evap pump

10) I used a flat blade screwdriver to pop the lowest oetiker clamp, and then removed the 2 bracket bolts (can’t remember if 8 or 9mm socket)for the Evap. pump which gave room to allow it to drop sufficiently to access the upper pie and remove the 2nd oetiker clamp. With a little WD40 and gentle persuasion, the 2 vacuum pipes were removed allowing the pump to be removed.

Remove the wiring connector. Maybe there is an easy way to disconnect this, but I ended up using a small hook tool to carefully lift one side of the connector where there is a raised ‘bump’ before being able to disconnect it. Be careful as the plastic will be fragile by now!

11) I checked the new pump against the old one and discovered, I had 2 remove the 2 plastic pipe fitted to the new pump. I carefully used an Exacto-knife to take slices off the plastic pipe so as to not damage the pump outlets. “You have to remove the mounting plate from the old pump and transfer to the new one. You need to un-screw the 3 Torx screw holding it in place to the pump. I cleaned these up first and carefully removed. Leave the bracket off, as it is much easier to refit the new pump to the old vacuum pipes under the car without it fitted.

Old and new pumps. New pump with pipes
Old and new pumps. New pump with pipes

Old and new pumps, with new pump pipes removed
Old and new pumps, with new pump pipes removed

12) Replacement is the reversal, but with a couple of notes. I ended up using a lot of engineering terms trying to get the new pump back in, more mainly due to access to the new Oetiker clamps with the tools I have. I right-angle oetiker clamp tool would be ideal. I just had to fiddle about to get enough room to get my straight on tool into work. This almost took longer than the rest of the job!!

13) Re-fit the pump bracket using the 3 Torx screws, and replace the 2 bracket bolts.

14) Finally refit the heat shield, remount and tighten the rear muffler mount, and finally replace the 2 pop-rivets under the rear of the LH arch liner.

15) The rest is just the reversal from there on, not forgetting to replace the plastic nut on the rear arch liner!

16) I had to then re-set the fault code for the ‘minor evap system leak’ with my code reader.

17) All has been good since then!

18) Finally, I learned the hard way, but as JRL pointed out, the Evap. Pump is the usual suspect in this problem. I was told the pump gives a ‘Major Evap. Leak’ code, but was not the case for my car. I had already replaced the Evap. Valve and the gas cap. The cost of the parts, and time it took me to replace was not much, but I replaced parts that were probably ok. It is a coin toss on if it was worthwhile spending an hour of dealer time to have identified the problem source first. I ended up paying for this anyway, as I may have needed the system ‘fogged’ if the pump had been ok to find the leak. I have now replaced all the major parts anyway.

Hope this guide is of help to others out there!

Neil.

2006 XC70 Pump Replacement with photos

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