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DIY: 2005 Volvo XC90 2.5T 110K miles: Timing Belt, Water Pump, Serpentine Belt

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cn90
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Volvo Repair Database DIY: 2005 Volvo XC90 2.5T 110K miles: Timing Belt, Water Pump, Serpentine Belt

Post by cn90 » Sat Nov 25, 2017 8:51 pm

DIY: 2005 Volvo XC90 2.5T Timing Belt, Water Pump, Serpentine Belt

My 2005 XC90 2.5T with 110K miles, routine maintenance time. There are many DIYs and youtube videos, so no need for me to repeat those, but I will list only the important items.

So, MAKE SURE YOU READ THE LINKS BELOW FIRST!

---> My DIY: 1998 Volvo S70 Timing Belt Overhaul, Water Pump, Cam Seals, Serpentine Belt Overhaul
viewtopic.php?t=53722

---> If you need to replace the Cam Seals, which won’t leak until 190K miles or so, plus by that time you probably need new VVT sprockets, which are expensive, you need special tool to lock the cam from the Rear Side of the engine. Make sure you read these threads:

viewtopic.php?f=10&t=67874

https://volvoforums.com/forum/volvo-xc9 ... 251/page2/


---> How to adjust tensioner:



---> FCP-Euro Youtube Video:




---> My Note on the FCP-Euro Video. ..OK, I did it using “minimalist approach”:

1. No need to remove the cross bar.
2. No need to move the Coolant Reservoir. I guess you can move the PS Pump Reservoir but you can leave it alone.
3. No need to remove Crank Pulley, see note later re 3 “tricky areas” to work the TB around the Crank Pulley.


TOOLS, BOLT SIZE, TORQUE VALUES:

- I used Red LocTite on all the bolts just to be sure.

- You will need roughly 1 gallon of 50-50 coolant mix.

- TB Cover: 10-mm bolt.

- Serpentine Belt Idler Pulley: 14-mm bolt. I don’t know the torque but hand-tight, then give it a twist.
I used Harbor Freight serp belt tool + Torx 60 socket, but you don’t have to. Just pry the plastic cap and use 14-mm wrench to undo the belt. Re Torx size, the correct size is T60 but T55 would work to.

- WP 7 bolts: 10-mm; 20 Nm.

- TB Mechanical Tensioner: 12-mm bolt; 20 Nm.

- TB Idler Pulley: 10-mm bolts; 25 Nm.

- Crank Pulley: 30-mm nut.


PROCEDURE:

1. At 110K miles, the Timing Belt shows very minor hairline cracks. My guess is this TB should last another 30K or so. Ditto for the Serpentine Belt, minor rib cracks but no big deal, it should easily last another 30K. Anyway, I put this Serpentine Belt in the trunk as spare for long trips.

---> Serp Belt pulley free-wheels and slightly noisy, glad I replaced it.

---> The TB Idler Pulley is still solid, no free-wheeling. The TB tensioner pulley: still OK ---> no free-wheeling, but this is the culprit in many forums…when this particular item goes south, there goes your engine.

---> The Water Pump bearing is solid, no play at 100K. My experience with my S70, at 145K, slight bearing play but no leak. This WP is known to last 180K-200K easily. Anyway, I am there, I may as well replace it.

XC90-TB-01.jpg
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XC90-TB-02.jpg
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2. A note on TB and VVT system. Do some readings, but the TB does not care about the VVT system, all the TB cares is the relationship between the Crank Sprocket and the Cam Sprockets, as long as this relationship is perfect, you will be fine. The VVT is activated by the solenoids, allowing the cams to be advanced or retarded as needed.

3. RF Wheel removed, I used 2 Jack Stands: the standard 4-leg Jack Stand and a Screw-Type Jack Stand, this allows me to have 2 Jack Stands for maximum safety and the Screw-Type Jack Stand allows the load to be evenly distributed between 2 Jack Stands.

XC90-TB-03.jpg
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4. Serpentine Belt. The correct socket is Torx 60, but Torx 55 will be fine (I tried T55 and it is OK too). I also have the Harbor Freight Serpentine Tool ($16 or so), this tool is very handy for tight space. If you don’t have any of these tools, no sweat…pry the plastic cap and use a 14-mm wrench, using “2-wrench trick”.

XC90-TB-04.jpg
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XC90-TB-05.jpg
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XC90-TB-06.jpg
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5. In the wheel well, remove the 2 plastic 10-mm nuts, peel the plastic back. I used a piece of wood to prop it open. Using a 30-mm socket + extension + breaker bar, turn the Crank CLOCKWISE until you see the Cam mark (very tiny marks) lining up with the UPPER TB Cover.
---> Now turn the Crank another ¼ turn CLOCKWISE, then COUNTER-CLOCKWISE to line up the Cam marks again. This procedure (turning ¼ turn CW, then CCW) releases the spring tension inside the VVT.

XC90-TB-07.jpg
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XC90-TB-08.jpg
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XC90-TB-09.jpg
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6. Now come my EASY TRICKS!
---> Note that the FCP-Euro youtube video shows you the tiny marks in the Crank, and put the TB Cover back to check timing? Well, no need for any of those.
---> Assuming the car is stock and the timing is correct, here are the EASY steps:
---> Once the Cams line up, do NOT remove the TB yet. For each Cam, place 2 white dots (Liquid Paper etc.), then 2 corresponding Sharpie marks as shown. This way, you don’t need to place the TB Cover back to check. One of the 2 white dots should be on the same tooth as the Front timing mark (you don't have to, but I did it this way to be kosher)...The idea is: the 2 white dots line up with the 2 black Sharpie marks.

XC90-TB-10.jpg
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---> Now, mark the Crank with white dots as shown. This is the bullet-proof way and very easy to tell if you line things up correctly. Remove the two (2) 10-mm bolts, then remove the small plastic cover.

XC90-TB-11.jpg
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---> If you want to double-check, then reach down with your LEFT Index finger and feel the ridge (RED Arrow) on the Crank Sprocket.

XC90-TB-12.jpg
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---> I marked the Crank with Sharpie just to be sure. For the tensioner pulley, watch the FCP-Euro youtube video and tighten the 12-mm bolt finger-tight to prevent the adjuster from moving freely. Now with the 6-mm Hex key, adjust the tensioner so the vertical arm moves to about 2 o’clock position (to tighten the TB), then back to 12 o’clock position (if you are at 20 degrees C).

XC90-TB-13.jpg
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XC90-TB-13a.jpg
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7. Idler Pulley 10-mm bolts:

XC90-TB-14.jpg
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8. The debate whether to remove the Crank Pulley: I have done many Volvo TB jobs, there is no need to remove the Crank if you pay attention to the following photo. When the Crank Pulley is in place, whether you remove the TB or install the new TB, there are 3 places you have to work around:
- The 2 plastic edges #1 and #2.
- The Oil Pump Snub.
---> Just turn the TB 90 degrees sideway to slide it in. I wet my fingers with some water on the TB so it slides in nicely (just an option, you don’t have to do this step).

XC90-TB-15.jpg
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That is it boys and girls…
Don’t forget to read the IMPORTANT NOTE below!

IMPORTANT NOTE: Once done, fill with 50-50 coolant to about 1 inch above Max. Drive around the blocks until the engine is HOT. Chances are air will bleed out and the reservoir will be empty (I filled the reservoir to 1 inch above Max, and after a drive, it is empty!). If you decide to go somewhere, then carry at least ½ gallon of 50-50 coolant in the trunk as you will likely need to top it up (fill reservoir only with COLD engine). Best is to drive around the blocks, go home and top it up with COLD engine.
Last edited by cn90 on Mon Nov 27, 2017 11:19 am, edited 1 time in total.
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2005 XC90 2.5T 110K+

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Re: DIY: 2005 Volvo XC90 2.5T 110K miles: Timing Belt, Water Pump, Serpentine Belt

Post by cn90 » Sat Nov 25, 2017 9:06 pm

Forgot to add a few notes:

1. It is written everywhere but I need to stress the importance of hand-rotate the Crank Pulley with at least 2 revolutions, then check the Cam marks before starting the engine.

2. The Water Pump Gasket trick: apply a thin smear of grease on both sides of the gasket.
- Then install the gasket on the engine first, make sure it sticks there.
- Then install the WP.
Last edited by cn90 on Sun Nov 26, 2017 5:32 pm, edited 1 time in total.
2004 V70 2.5T 100K+
2005 XC90 2.5T 110K+

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Re: DIY: 2005 Volvo XC90 2.5T 110K miles: Timing Belt, Water Pump, Serpentine Belt

Post by cuhfs » Sun Nov 26, 2017 2:26 pm

Good stuff. Thanks!
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Re: DIY: 2005 Volvo XC90 2.5T 110K miles: Timing Belt, Water Pump, Serpentine Belt

Post by cn90 » Sun Nov 26, 2017 9:56 pm

On the issue of Crank Marks, there are tons of youtube videos, DIYs showing the tiny tiny marks on the crank that are so hard to see unless you have good eyes or you remove the Crank Pulley.

As mentioned above, there is a MUCH MUCH EASIER way to line it up, even with the Crank Pulley in place.

1. Method #1: use the index finger and feel both ridges (RED arrows).

2. Method #2: This method is much easier!
- Note the Locating Pin is at approx 1 o'clock position.
- Incidentally, one of the Crank Pulley bolts lines up with the bolt on the Engine Mount (assuming your Engine Mount is still good and not collapsed), as shown in the red rectangle at roughly 8 o'clock position.

Start method #2 because it is very easy to do, then verify with #1. This is basically a bullet-proof approach!

XC90-TB-16.jpg
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Re: DIY: 2005 Volvo XC90 2.5T 110K miles: Timing Belt, Water Pump, Serpentine Belt

Post by erikv11 » Thu Mar 22, 2018 5:19 pm

Be very careful with this last tip, shortcuts can be a bad idea when timing an interference engine. In this case, the "Method #2" will never get the job done, you must always complete Method #1 (the standard method) to line up the marks. Explained here in just a couple posts: viewtopic.php?t=83534
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Re: DIY: 2005 Volvo XC90 2.5T 110K miles: Timing Belt, Water Pump, Serpentine Belt

Post by ggleavitt » Mon Mar 26, 2018 2:43 pm

I think this is an outstanding post.
My only concern would be not locking down the back with the tool for someone who has never done this job before. It's not impossible to get one of the camshafts to move while putting the Tbelt back on, and once it's all together you can indeed have everything looking good and turning correctly only to then have to deal with a CEL because the VVT swing exceeds the +/- 8 degree expected range from TDC. This is exactly what happened on my first job, fortunately I was able to compensate within the hub ring ovals (VIDA had me around 2 degrees too high on the intake).

Cam seal replacement interval seems very reasonable assuming PCV system is working properly.
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Re: DIY: 2005 Volvo XC90 2.5T 110K miles: Timing Belt, Water Pump, Serpentine Belt

Post by cn90 » Sun May 06, 2018 9:54 am

ggleavitt wrote:...My only concern would be not locking down the back with the tool for someone who has never done this job before. It's not impossible to get one of the camshafts to move while putting the Tbelt back on, and once it's all together you can indeed have everything looking good and turning correctly only to then have to deal with a CEL because the VVT swing exceeds the +/- 8 degree expected range from TDC. This is exactly what happened on my first job, fortunately I was able to compensate within the hub ring ovals (VIDA had me around 2 degrees too high on the intake)...
- No need to worry about locking tool when doing TB for P2 cars with VVT.

- Actually, even for VVT cars, all the TB cares is its relationship between CRANK and CAM sprockets.
In other words, despite what VIDA and Volvo said in their repair book, when it is all done, as long as the TB lines up with the CRANK marks and CAM marks, you are good.

- What happens is the CRANK and CAM sprockets rotate as designed (this is the job of the TB itself), the CAMshaft itself is advanced or retarded based on oil activation via the solenoid.
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Re: DIY: 2005 Volvo XC90 2.5T 110K miles: Timing Belt, Water Pump, Serpentine Belt

Post by ggleavitt » Thu May 10, 2018 10:35 am

Lots of ways to do this I guess, outstanding post regardless...


edit- add some words
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Re: DIY: 2005 Volvo XC90 2.5T 110K miles: Timing Belt, Water Pump, Serpentine Belt

Post by oragex » Fri May 11, 2018 8:58 am

cn90 wrote:
Sat Nov 25, 2017 8:51 pm

The Water Pump bearing is solid, no play at 100K.

Serpentine Belt Idler Pulley: 14-mm bolt just pry the plastic cap.

Once done, fill with 50-50 coolant

The debate whether to remove or not the Crank Pulley

My tips along this,

Don't replace the water pump with the first belt, as all Volvo dealers don't replace it either. The only wp that failed are when shady mechanics replaced a perfectly good pump at 100K with a chinese one, which failed 20000 miles later on.

Some people had issues removing the plastic cap over the tensioner. Use a long flat screw driver and pry exactly at the very edge of the plastic cap. I think there is also a small hole at some point, but it's hard to see. As for the long wrench, I believe on later engines the tensioner has only torx bolts on them - no more 14mm bolt, and on the S60 for example there is no space to use a regular ratchet with a torx bit.

50-50 coolant: use only Distilled water from a drugstore (local pharmacy), they sell a gallon for like $2. May also use de-mineralised water from the hardware store but I trust this less, plus is more expensive. Distilled water is perfect as it has zero minerals in it. If flushing the coolant with a garden hose, make sure no tap water remains inside the engine although it's almost impossible to remove it from the heater core. I'd rather refill with two gallons of distilled water, then flush again. Many shady mechanics will use tap water mixed with coolant, which will cause lime deposits and restrict the coolant flow inside the engine and inside the heater core.

It is possible to pass the belt without removing the crank pulley, after removing the small plastic cover with two bolts. However the space is really tight in several points near the crank pulley (there are 4 or 5 such points): at these points the belt has to be slid vertically which is not only tricky but also can force the belt to get twisted which can damage the material inside the belt (there is even a warning on timing belt kits not to crimp the belt).

I think the most important aspect of the timing belt is the tensioner setting. It will take several tries before adjusting it properly and at every try, the whole adjusting procedure must be done from the point 0: if the needle went too far to the left, the whole procedure of adjusting must be started all over again. It must be done with the engine cold in warm weather temperatures (not with a cold engine when the car is parked outside in winter). The tensioner must be inspected again after running the engine for a few seconds then shutting it off - the needle should stay in the center, and also after driving the car for a while and letting the engine cool down completely. One sign that the tension is not correct - even when the needle is in the center - is a belt that is wobbling on the cam pulleys or a belt that is running offset (ie it's not centered on the cam pulleys). Also, the needle should not wobble. Setting the correct 15 ft.lb (20nm) is also essential for this bolt.

There are two types of tensioners. The first type is for up to mid 2005 up to Engine Serial Number 3188688 : this is not the car's VIN number, it's the engine serial number found on a sticker on the timing belt cover, or stamped very washed out on rear on the engine block). The second type, shown in this DIY runs from mid 2005 and up after the engine number mentioned. These two types are not interchangeable.

One extra note on the tensioners. If you look at the front washer that has the allen hole in it, normally this hole must be at 11 o'clock when you take it out of the box. Note that this front washer can be rotated by hand so always have the allen hole at 11 o'clock before placing the tensioner in the car. Once on the engine, when setting the tension the allen key must move first from 11 o'clock counter clockwise which will cause the needle to move to the right until it stops moving, then the key is moved slowly and carefully clockwise to bring the needle to the center. I found I needed to keep the needle in the center with the allen key while tightening down the tensioner bolt, or the needle would move away from the center - this is the trickiest part and took me many tries.

Finaly, use only genuine or Continental/Contitech belt kits (they make the belt for Volvo), only Aisin water pumps, only Ina tensioner or roller. Gates may be another choice (although on other cars Gates has been problematic). Do not use any other brand for the timing belt kit.
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