2002 Volvo S80 Maintenance Schedule

2002 S80 Maintenance Schedule -

Service Operation Schedule of Services 2002 S80 miles x 1000 7.5 15 22.5 30 37.5 45 52.5 60 67.5 75 82.5 90 97.5 105 112.5 120 127.5 135 142.5 150 km x 1000 12 24 36 48 60 72 84 96 108 120 132 144 156 168 180 192 204 216 228 240 months 12 […]

XC90 2.5T Timing Belt, Water Pump, Serpentine Belt

2005 Xc90 T5 Timing Belt Water Pump

It’s time for your 5-cylinder Volvo XC90 timing belt (interval PDF here), and you want to save some money and do it yourself. If you’re mechanically inclined and have worked on cars before, this will probably be not too difficult for you to complete. Keep in mind this tutorial is not only comprehensive and well […]

Crank Marks — The EASY Way to Line Them Up for Timing Belt

Line Up Crank Marks

Yesterday longtime MVS Contributor and Volvo DIY author cn90 posted a method to avoid the headache of lining up crank marks when you’re replacing a timing belt on a Volvo 5-cylinder engine. I just did the timing belt, WP, etc. on my 2005 XC90 2.5T with 110K miles. I just came up with a nice […]

V8 Timing Cover Leak Job Parts List

Jason at FCP Euro has a 2006 XC90 V8 and this is his parts list for fixing a leaking timing cover. A leaking timing cover on V8 Volvos (XC90 2005–2011 and S80 2006–2010) is both a common and certain eventuality. It’s a problem, sure, but overall V8 Volvos are good vehicles and worth this effort. And face […]

Failed Water Pump Causes Timing Belt Failure

If you hate to see good Volvos die, look away now. Don’t click on this. Don’t read this. Go outside for a nice walk. Driving to work this morning, my timing belt broke. Chances are if you’re reading this you “get” that. It’s the Great Fear of any interference engine owner who DIYs. Possibly you […]

Stage 0 and So Much More… Fix List for a V70

MVS Contributor Sledddriver goes on an multi-month blistering repair & fix odyssey, taking his 1998 V70 T5 from the edge of roadworthiness to 100% functional and reliable… all for not even $1000.  This is Stage 0 and way, way more. Following up on Tryingbe’s theme [of restoring to 100% a P80 Volvo], here’s a list of sled-work […]

Serpentine Belt Tool DIY

Found a post from someone else on how to make a serpentine belt tool. For a 1.99$ get a pipe cap, grind it with a metal grinder ( duh 😀 ) and then drill a hole through the thread area and use a metal bar to give it some force, I used a big drill bit i had around my garage. It worked just fine. Thanks to the person who came up with this idea, just thought I would spread it and save you 30 dollars as someone else did to me.

Fixing Up 99 S70 T5

MVS member Auburn T5 goes bananas on fixing up a 1998 Volvo S70 T5. Stage 0, new transmission, new struts, shocks and springs, you name it. Documented with photos too. Did a lot of stage zero work – inspected vacuum lines, changed oil filter, fuel filter, top motor mount, k&N panel filter, timing belt, water […]

Engine oil cooler line replacement DIY

MVS Forums Contributor Jason (jreed) blasts out a beautiful, detailed, downloadable DIY on replacing oil cooler lines on a Volvo 850. This DIY is likely applicable  for any Volvo P80 model. “The lower cooler line (lower = the one that goes to the lower inlet on the radiator) had developed a very slow leak at the […]

XC90 Wet Carpet

MVS Forums member VFLXC90 had a wet carpet disaster in his XC90. This is how he tracked it down and fixed it. The XC 90 had wet carpet this summer. I youtubed the sunroof drain fix. The drains were clear? The carpet was soaked. When I ran the A/C the condensation wasn’t dripping out under […]

98 V70 T5 Replacing the Coolant Hoses in Pics

You’ll want to remove your air cleaner box and also the duct pointing to the front part of the car. The air cleaner is set in with some tabs into a rubber retainer. Just pull up and to the passenger side to get it out. There were a few connections that need to be removed as well. Finally, tie the accordion air duct out of the way so that you’ll have a clear view. They are already out in this picture. I just highlighted where these parts used to be. It really opens up the area.

Standing on the driver side, you can look are clearly see the large hose (lower radiator hose) where it connects to the neck into the engine block. You can also see where the heater hoses go into the firewall. The Lower radiator hose is not too hard to access at this point. Loosen the clamp (above the yellow arrow in the picture) and pull it off. The other end is on the bottom of the radiator on the driver side. You’ll have to remove the lower engine cover plastic to get access to that.